Align Technology ( ALGN) was surging more than 20% after the California-based maker of invisible braces said it lost only $11.7 million excluding items, or 19 cents a share, in all of 2006. Analysts polled by Thomson Financial were looking for a 43-cent per-share loss. Revenue, which came to $206.4 million, was almost in line with the mean target. In 2005 the company had earned $1.4 million, or 2 cents a share, on slightly higher revenue of $207.1 million. Shares were gaining $2.87 to $16.64.

Theragenics ( TGX), which makes medical devices for cancer treatment and surgery, swung to a fourth-quarter and full-year profit -- successes that CEO M. Christine Jacobs attributes to a far more diversified line of products than what the company previously had. Revenue grew 30% to $14.8 million for the quarter and 22% to $54.1 million for the year, representing the company's highest-ever quarterly and annual sales, respectively. Full-year earnings came to $6.6 million, or 20 cents a share, up sharply from a 2005 loss of $29 million, or 93 cents a share. The Buford, Ga., company was trading up 71 cents, or 20.5%, to $4.17.

Compugen ( CGEN) struck a deal with fellow Israeli company Teva ( TEVA) for jointly discovering biomarkers that can indicate drug toxicity prior to clinical stages of drug development. First on the agenda will be those signifying nephrotoxicity, or toxicity of the kidney cells. Financial terms, if any, weren't disclosed, but Teva will have a license to use any discoveries for research and development, and Compugen will retain rights for commercialization and internal use. Compugen shares were climbing 33 cents, or 11.6%, to $3.18 in recent trading. Teva shares were unchanged.

General Employment Enterprises ( JOB) surged after the staffing-services firm tripled its fiscal first-quarter income from last year to $296,000, or 6 cents a share. Revenue edged up 3% to $4.8 million year over year. The Illinois-based company's stock was rising 32 cents, or 17.2%, to $2.18.

Winland Electronics ( WEX) jumped after the Mankato, Minn.-based company said it signed a yearlong contract with an unnamed customer to make an "innovative security product for law enforcement applications" that will potentially generate more than $1 million over the life of the agreement, depending on the customer's success at selling the product to municipalities and law enforcement outfits. Winland says it shipped $140,000 worth of the product to the customer in the last quarter and will ship $350,000 more in the current one. Shares were adding 40 cents, or 11.7%, to $3.82.

Alfacell ( ACEL) was riding high on news that the Food and Drug Administration had granted its Onconase product orphan-drug designation for the treatment of malignant mesothelioma, a rare form of lung cancer. This will afford the Bloomfield, N.J., company seven years of marketing exclusivity should the FDA approve the drug for that use, as well as eligibility for tax credits, funding and other benefits. Alfacell is currently testing the product for the unresectable form of the disease (meaning those tumors that cannot be surgically removed) in a Phase IIIb trial. Shares were gaining 12 cents, or 7.4%, to $1.75.

Amtech Systems ( ASYS), an Arizona-based company that makes equipment for semiconductor and solar-cell production, was rising on word of $3.5 million in new orders for thermal-processing and automation systems from two Asia-based solar-cell-industry customers. Shares were up 29 cents, or 4.4%, to $6.94.

Majesco Entertainment ( COOL) tumbled after the video-game developer posted a non-GAAP loss of $1.7 million, or 7 cents a share, in the quarter ended Oct. 31. Losses narrowed considerably from last year's $34.2 million, or $1.54 a share, but two analysts were looking for only a 6-cent downside. Sales, which came to $21.5 million compared with last year's $4.6 million, handily beat the $13.8 million estimate. Also, full-year losses -- at $3.1 million, or 14 cents a share -- beat estimates by 2 cents. Still, shares of the Edison, N.J., company were falling 39 cents, or 19%, to $1.66.

Volterra Semiconductor ( VLTR) shares receded after sales didn't meet Wall Street expectations. The Fremont, Calif., semiconductor maker brought in $21.2 million in revenue, or 57% more than it did a year ago, but analysts were seeking about $1 million more. Volterra beat income estimates by a penny, posting profits of $4.5 million, or 17 cents a share, excluding items. Last year's earnings totaled $1.2 million, or a nickel a share. Volterra stock was sliding $1.80, or 12%, to $13.20.

Independent Bank ( IBCP) slipped on plummeting fourth-quarter income. The Michigan-based regional bank said it earned $1 million, or 4 cents a share, compared with last year's $11.2 million, or 47 cents a share. Full-year earnings were also lower, to $33.8 million, or $1.45 a share, down from $45.7 million, or $1.92 a share, in 2005. The bank blames the downtick on several factors, including falling interest income and goodwill impairment charges. Shares were down $1.71, or 7.2%, to $22.17.

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