Does this sound familiar?

You've learned to trust your instincts. You've learned to trust your judgment.

You value your independence and the accomplishments it has brought. Most things work out best when you do them yourself.

And your experiences trusting others to do things for you are mixed at best.

That sounds like me, and I'll bet it's a familiar tone for many of you.

As consumed as we are by daily professional life, we still want to be in charge of our affairs -- especially our financial affairs. It's just part of our character.

But for some of you, financial topics such as tax laws, insurance policies and investment analysis trigger a reach for the ignore button. You have no appetite for them.

Or, in a valiant self-recognition of character, you musical virtuosos or crackerjack attorneys realize you simply don't possess the skills, interest or bandwidth to manage financial affairs. You gladly throw them over the wall to the experts.

But suppose you've been doing your finances all along. You're doing OK; you have a solid grip, and the bills are getting paid.

It can be hard to let go.

When the do-it-yourself home improvement project requires plumbing work -- which you've never done or don't want to do -- you call in the professionals.

Are there similar boundaries when it comes to your finances?

Click here for the video version of this story from Jennifer Openshaw.

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