Total System Services ( TSS) shares jumped more than 9% in after-hours trading Tuesday as the merchant-services company darted past fourth-quarter Wall Street estimates. Profits mushroomed 75.2% to $87.1 million, or 44 cents a share, beating the consensus by 18 cents, according to Thomson Financial. Sales climbed 19.8% to $503.9 million, also topping the $439.5 million view. Shares were adding $2.58 to $29.69.

Vision-Sciences ( VSCI) surged after the company announced it will sell the rights and assets related to production and distribution of its EndoSheath products for use within the ear, nose and throat field to Medtronic ( MDT).

Natick, Mass.-based Vision Sciences will receive $27 million upon contract close, and $7 million more contingent on certain milestones and on agreement compliance. Vision Sciences shares were up 12 cents, or 8.7%, to $1.50. Medtronic was slipping 26 cents to $54.24.

Hi-Shear Technology ( HSR) soared after the company, which makes space-satellite parts, broadened its fiscal second-quarter profits to $905,000, or 13 cents a share, compared with $650,000, or a dime a share, a year ago. Revenue inched up to $5 million from $4.7 million a year ago. Shares of the Torrance, Calif., company were gaining 75 cents, or 8.1%, to $10.

Investors Financial Services ( IFIN) rose after the Boston-based company topped Street estimates. Earnings came to $35.7 million in the fourth quarter, or 53 cents a share, which beats targets by 2 cents despite last year's higher profits of $39.5 million, or 60 cents a share. The asset-management firm narrowed its full-year profits as well, to $153.8 million, or $2.28 a share, from $159.8 million, or $2.37 a share, in 2005. Still, shares were rising $1.89, or 4.3%, to $45.42.

Gentium ( GENT) climbed after the Food and Drug Administration granted the Defibrotide orphan drug status, which is given only to promising treatments of rare diseases and conditions. This may qualify the Italian drugmaker for certain exclusivity and tax-credit-related incentives. Defibrotide is a preventative treatment for potentially lethal hepatic veno-occlusive disease, which can result from high-dosage cancer treatments and stem-cell transplantation. Shares were trading up 40 cents, or 2.1%, to $19.50.

Isis Pharmaceuticals ( ISIS) fell after the Carlsbad, Calif., company privately offered $125 million worth of convertible notes, with an additional 30-day, $37.5 million purchase option. Shares were losing 78 cents, or 6.5%, to $11.30.

Intel ( INTC) dropped after the chipmaker reported sliding profits. Excluding items, the Santa Clara, Calif., company earned $5 billion in 2006, or 86 cents a share -- 39% less per share than it did in 2005. It brought in $1.7 billion in income in the fourth quarter, or 30 cents a share, down 25% on a per-share basis from a year ago. Revenue dipped 9% to $35.4 billion and 5% to $9.7 billion, respectively, for the full year and fourth quarter. Looking ahead, the company expects first-quarter sales between $8.7 billion and $9.3 billion. Shares were falling 66 cents, or 3%, to $21.64.

Lifecore Biomedical ( LCBM) earned $1.4 million, or a dime a share, in the quarter ended Dec. 31, essentially flat-lining with last year's profits and missing one analyst's projection by a penny. The Chaska, Minn.-based company's revenue edged up to $16.6 million from $15.2 million a year ago, but that also fell slightly short of the $16.8 million view. Shares were trading down 41 cents, or 2.4%, to $16.50.

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