Digital video recording pioneer TiVo ( TIVO) may be a household brand, but the company appears to be stuck in a rut.

TiVo's stock essentially finished where it started in 2006 (it closed the year at $5.12), while progress also stalled on a deal to integrate its software with digital video recorders already in the homes of Comcast ( CMCSA) subscribers.

Profitability looks distant, too: The company lost $11.1 million in its most recent quarter and expects to lose as much as $38 million in its current fourth quarter.

But perhaps even more important, TiVo faces a possibility of being marginalized in a world where user-generated content is exploding and consumers have stakes in multiple media beyond television, such as digital photos and online videos and music.

Content convergence and the ability to access media any place, anytime is becoming a fast-growing need that TiVo won't be able to meet unless it reinvents itself.

For TiVo, the question is: Will it expand its digital content radar or just be limited to being a smaller part of the cable universe?

If the company just wants to follow the old model, then it's condemned to a slow death, says Joe Costello, CEO of Orb Networks, an Emeryville, Calif.-based start-up. "TiVo has to transform itself," he says. "It's a very good application for recording TV, but look, it is a much bigger world, and they have to make a bigger play."

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