Omrix Biopharmaceuticals ( OMRI) was one of Tuesday's small-cap winners as the New York-based company swung to a third-quarter profit. The company posted income of $8.1 million, or 53 cents a share, compared with loss of $321,000, or 3 cents a share, a year ago. Revenue increased 137% to $18.3 million. Analysts polled by Thomson First Call were looking for earnings of 33 cents a share on $16.4 million in revenue.

Looking ahead, Omrix raised its full-year 2006 profit guidance to a range of $1.40 to $1.45 a share, up from $1.15 to $1.20 a share. The company projected product sales in the range of $54 million to $55 million, up from earlier guidance of $50 million to $51.5 million. Shares were trading up $2.25, or 11.4%, to $21.91.

Playboy Enterprises ( PLA) gained after the Chicago-based entertainment company reported lower third-quarter earnings, but still beat Wall Street expectations. The company posted income of $1.1 million, or 3 cents a share, down from $3.2 million, or 10 cents a share, a year ago. Revenue rose 2% to $82.3 million. Wall Street had been expecting the company to lose 3 cents a share on $79.4 million.

"The quarter's results reflected the continued strength of our growth businesses of global licensing and new digital media, both of which reported double-digit profit gains," said CEO Christie Hefner in a statement. Shares were trading up 72 cents, or 6.9%, to $11.18.

SWS Group ( SWS) gained after the Dallas-based brokerage posted a rise in first-quarter income. The company earned $10.1 million, or 57 cents a share, on revenue of $116.1 million, up from $7.2 million, or 41 cents a share, on revenue of $96.8 million a year ago. "We had an excellent start to our new fiscal year," said CEO Donald W. Hultgren in a statement. "Our income from continuing operations increased 52 percent in the first quarter, and with daily market volume increasing, we anticipate continued progress toward our performance goals." Shares were trading up $2.85, or 10.7%, to $29.60.

Anthracite Capital ( AHR) slipped after the New York-based company saw a drop in third-quarter earnings. The company posted income available to common shareholders of $12.6 million, or 22 cents a share, down from $15.1 million, or 28 cents a share, a year ago. Operating earnings were 21 cents a share, down from 27 cents a share a year ago. Wall Street was looking for earnings of 30 cents a share. Shares were trading down $1.66, or 11.9%, to $12.34.

Bookham ( BKHM) tumbled after the optical-networking-components maker missed fiscal first-quarter targets and guided lower for the second quarter. The San Jose, Calif.-based company lost $23 million, or 38 cents a share, for the quarter ended Sept. 30. A year ago the company lost $500,000, or 2 cents a share. Excluding certain costs, the latest-quarter adjusted loss was 26 cents a share. Revenue fell to $56.4 million from $62.6 million a year earlier, as revenue from Nortel ( NT) fell to $14.6 million from $18.5 million in the fourth quarter.

Analysts surveyed by Thomson Financial were looking for a 25-cent loss on sales of $57.1 million. Gross margin rose to 17% in the latest quarter from 9% in the fourth quarter but fell from the year-ago 23%. The company forecast second-quarter revenue of $56 million to $59 million, below the $60.6 million Thomson target. Shares were falling 44 cents, or 12.1%, to $3.19.

InPhonic ( INPC) shares jumped after the company says it trimmed its losses and raised sales guidance. The Washington, D.C.-based online cell-phone retailer posted a net loss of $4.8 million, compared with the $4.9 million a year ago.

Looking ahead, the company said it expects revenue in the fourth quarter to be about $120 million. Analysts were looking for sales of $118 million, according to Reuters Research. The mobile phone seller, which operates Wirefly.com, has recently attracted $100 million in financing from Goldman Sachs ( GS), a 14% stakeholder in the company. Shares were trading up $1.97, or 21.8%, to $11.01.

Technical Olympic USA ( TTEK) tumbled after the Hollywood, Fla.-based homebuilder said it would file for a five-day extension to the Nov. 9 deadline for filing its third-quarter results because it anticipates it will report a significant change in its results of operations due to asset impairment charges.

Separately, the company said it had informed Deutsche Bank that it does not believe Technical Olympic USA's obligations regarding its Transeastern Joint Venture have been triggered. The company said Transeastern Joint Venture's debt problems are a direct result of the highly leveraged capital structure of the transaction together with adverse market conditions, which will prevent the joint venture from achieving the anticipated 3,500 to 4,000 annual home deliveries.

The company said that any demands placed upon it were "clearly premature," adding that "it is our belief that the circumstances being experienced by the Transeastern Joint Venture today are clearly a reflection of the Joint Venture's inability to sell and deliver the volume of homes necessary to support the capital structure due to the downturn in the Florida housing market." Shares were tumbling $3.29, or 30.5%, to $7.50.

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