But that was tame compared with similar events in the company's recent past. At a media event last year, for instance, Jobs announced that Apple was killing off the iPod mini , its most popular MP3 player at the time, and replacing it with the iPod nano.

That gambit paid off, with Apple selling millions of nanos over the holiday season last year, and the device quickly became the company's newest best-selling model.

To be sure, the company may feel no real need for radical changes right now. As Jobs mentioned in the presentation, sales of the company's iPods comprise 75.6% of the U.S. market for MP3 players, and sales of songs through iTunes make up 88% of the legal music download market.

Additionally, Jobs offered little in the way of an update on what could be one of the most crucial problems facing Apple: its probe into past stock-option "irregularities."

In an interview with CNBC that was broadcast after the event, Jobs said that the company's options practices are not under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission or other regulators and that the company should complete its internal probe into the matter "in the not too terribly distant future."

"We're focused on our own house right now," Jobs told CNBC, marking the first time he's talked about it in person and the first time the company has discussed it in about a month. "We are letting our investigation have its due course."

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