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Anytime the market is up significantly, the way to make money is by being aggressive, Jim Cramer told viewers of his "Mad Money" TV show Wednesday.

Because the market was "en fuego" Wednesday, Cramer said he believes that people should start making trades.

In particular, Cramer advised his viewers to make a trade on Research In Motion ( RIMM).

The Waterloo, Ontario-based company is involved in the design, manufacture and marketing of wireless products for the mobile-communications market. Many people may know the company best as the maker of the BlackBerry device.

RIM shot up to $90 and reached its peak in March, and the stock has been down since then, Cramer said, adding that this stock is now beckoning.

After two horrible quarters, the company is set to report its fiscal year 2007 first quarter on June 29, he said. Research In Motion is not an investment, but a trade because it is like a rollercoaster, Cramer emphasized.

RIM has a new 8700 BlackBerry model, which is currently offered by Cingular, but in the summer, this model will be offered by Verizon ( VZ) as well.

When that happens, sales will soar, Cramer said.

Right now there is a lot of negativity toward RIM, and even though it is risky to bet on a stock before the end of a quarter, Cramer believes that the company will report better-than-expected earnings.

Although the company has seen abrupt and extreme changes, Cramer believes that it can't go much lower.

Cramer believes that when the 8700 model starts appearing in Verizon stores, the stock will bounce back. That's when it's time to sell the stock, he says.

Strong Medicine

Conglomerates such as General Electric ( GE) and Siemens ( SI) have been buying similar-looking medical-equipment companies, Cramer said.

In the last year, there has been $60 billion in acquisitions in this space, and the reason for buying is demographics, Cramer said. America is aging rapidly, and Americans will do anything to look younger.

Because these big conglomerates are buying medical-device companies, Cramer believes that there's money to be made here. He advised viewers to start looking for the next medical-equipment play.

Earlier in June, Intermagnetics General ( IMGC) merged with Philips Electronics ( PHG).

In addition, Siemens acquired Diagnostic Products ( DP).

Market players could have made money from both acquisitions, Cramer said. Speculating about the next takeover, Cramer offered three candidates that have potential to be taken over and are buys.

First, Cramer recommended Conshohocken, Penn.-based Viasys Healthcare ( VAS), which develops medical devices, instruments, and medical and surgical products worldwide.

Cramer said to focus on the company's orthopedic business and its lung business, which he called very sophisticated. Cramer believes that Viasys is a takeover target for a company that wants lung exposure.

In addition, the fact that the company has cash and low debt makes it OK to speculate on it.

The next company, New Jersey-based Vital Signs ( VITL), is a great anesthetic and respiratory products maker and is sitting on a hoard of cash, Cramer said.

Sirona Dental ( SIRO), the third and last company Cramer recommended, merged with Schick Technologies on Tuesday.

The bottom line, said Cramer, is that big conglomerates want to make acquisitions in diagnostics companies; these three could be great takeover candidates, he said.

Am I Diversified?

The first caller to play "Am I Diversified?" owned the following five stocks: Cincinnati Bell ( CBB), CBIZ ( CBIZ), BHP Billiton ( BHP), LifeCell ( LIFC) and Quantum ( DSS).

Cramer said that although the caller was diversified, his portfolio was awful.

He advised the caller to get rid of CBB and go into Deutsche Telekom ( DT). He also recommended getting into Johnson & Johnson ( JNJ) instead of LifeCell and Qualcomm ( QCOM), which he owns for his charitable trust, Action Alerts PLUS , instead of Quantum.

The next caller owned Dow Chemical ( DOW), Home Depot ( HD), ConocoPhillips ( COP), Seagate Technology ( SXT) and EuroZinc Mining ( EZM).

Cramer blessed the portfolio and called it diversified. Although Cramer said he is not a fan of EuroZinc, he said it was all right to have one speculative stock.

The last caller owned Altria ( MO), Dow Chemical ( DOW), Google ( GOOG), Motorola ( MOT) and Palomar Medical Technologies ( PMTI).

Cramer said the caller did not have a diversified portfolio because Google and Motorola are both techs.

Saying that no pairs are allowed, he advised the caller to get out of Google and swap into a financial.

In the "Mad Mail" segment, Cramer told a viewer that it's the right time to get back into Nektar Therapeutics ( NKTR), because the hype about its Exubera inhaled-insulin product is about to begin.

He told another viewer that although Aeropostale's ( ARO) sales are down 2%, the setup to get into this company is perfect because nobody expects anything from it.

That's when you should strike, said Cramer.

Lightning Round

Bullish

Cramer was bullish on: Helmerich & Payne ( HP), Openwave Systems ( OPWV), Agilent Technologies ( A), Bank of America ( BAC), Talisman Energy ( TLM), Rite Aid ( RAD), Chesapeake Energy ( CHK), Qualcomm ( QCOM), Microchip Technology ( MCHP), Circuit City ( CC), Chevron ( CVX), Texas Instruments ( TXN), Hilton Hotels ( HLT), Frontline ( FRO), KB Home ( KBH) and Trinity ( TRN).

Bearish

Cramer was bearish on: Eagle Materials ( EXP) U.S. Bancorp ( USB), Ford Motor ( F), Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing ( TSM), Toll Brothers ( TOL), Silicon Image ( SIMG), Morgans Hotel ( MHGC), Alliance Resource Partners ( ARLP) and American Railcar ( ARII).

For more of Cramer's insights during the most recent Lightning Round, click here .


Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his latest book by clicking here.
At the time of publication, Cramer was long Qualcomm.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for TheStreet.com, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on Mad Money are his own and do not reflect the opinions of TheStreet.com or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither TheStreet.com, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or TheStreet.com is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

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Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in TheStreet.com, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.