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"Sometimes you just get handed something ... and you have to take the gift," Jim Cramer told "Mad Money" TV viewers Thursday, saying that the front page of The New York Times could mean money for Diebold ( DBD).

A story on the newspaper's front page said that New York State has yet to implement a new voting system, even though Congress passed the Help America Vote Act that requires states to update their voting systems, Cramer said.

And even though it has taken millions from the federal government to revamp its system, New York didn't upgrade fast enough, and now it's being sued by the Feds.

Cramer believes that Diebold will get most of NY's voting machine business, and that even if it doesn't make much of a difference to the company's bottom line, there are plenty of other states that could be sued because they've also had the problems upgrading their voting machines.

Plus, Cramer said that the company is aggressively moving into foreign markets for ATM machines, and that the company is "numero uno" in that business, as well as in voting equipment.

In the U.S., there are 760 ATMs per million people, and 790 per million in Brazil, Cramer said. But he said that in China there are only 53 per million and in India only 10 per million.

That's so much growth opportunity that Diebold is bound to prosper, Cramer said. And there's even room for a competitor like NCR ( NCR).

Nay to the Naysayers

"No matter how cheap a stock goes ... there will always be a bear saying the stock should go down because it's too expensive or too faddish," Cramer said.

"The curmudgeons would rather be poor," so Cramer said to ignore the naysayers and take a look at Build-A-Bear Workshop ( BBW).

Though he doesn't like the store, he believes that the stock is incredibly cheap, selling at only nine times next year's earnings when the company's cash is factored out of the equation. Plus, he said it should grow earnings at 21%.

"Maybe it is an insipid concept -- but cheap is cheap," Cramer said.

He said that 22% of Build-A-Bear's float is being shorted and that conventional wisdom is that the company is a fad and that is not going to last.

"I think the story will get bigger before it gets smaller," Cramer said, adding that he likes the company for strictly numerical reasons.

A year ago, the company had 170 stores, and he said that number could grow to 400 workshops before achieving saturation, making it a serious regional to national story

Those are always the best retail stories because they have the most growth, Cramer said. And even though some people believe that the company is a fad, 60% of its sales are from returning customers.

Plus, Cramer said that the company's growth projections don't take into account licensing agreements that Build-A-Bear has with Harper Collins and American Greetings.

Winging It

Cramer turned his attention to a stock that has "broken so many hearts, lost so many people so much money and flat lined for so long that everybody has forgotten that they ever had any potential."

That stock was Broadwing ( BWNG).

Five years ago, the company had a vision for an all-optical network that could be used to transmit voice and data everywhere, but then spent so much money building the network that the company nearly went bankrupt, Cramer said.

The stock soared to as high as $1,000 a share, reverse-split-adjusted, but then sank all the way to $3 a share.

But Cramer believes that even the worst, most broken company can turn itself around and that you just know what to look for.

Cramer said that Broadwing will be a turnaround story.

He said that cash flow and cash in hand for next year are good, and that the company has improved its cash flow burn rate for the fourth straight quarter, meaning that it's eating through less money.

Plus, the company broke even for the first time last quarter and is nearly debt-free, he said.

Cramer pointed out that the stock has gone from $4 to more than $9 in less than a year, and that its data and broadband businesses grew 15% last quarter. He said the company has seen increased enterprise demand for its product because it built a "best in class" optical network.

Russell Horowitz, CEO of Marchex ( MCHX) joined Cramer to discuss what his company does and why he still sees a bull market in search.

Marchex helps merchants place effective ads in the most effective places, and then fulfills those advertising needs through partner and proprietary arrangements, Horowitz said.

Despite all the flap about Google ( GOOG), Horowitz said there is still growth ahead.

He pointed out that markets move in cycles, and that includes paid search. While keyword search may be slowing, Horowitz said there will be acceleration in local search.

Horowitz added that while other companies compete with parts of the company's business, no one else has the same combination of assets.

Lightning Round


Cramer was bullish on Ultra Petroleum ( UPL), Biogen Idec ( BIIB), RF Micro Devices ( RFMD), Apple ( AAPL), Acadia Pharmaceuticals ( ACAD), Tata Motors ( TTM), Pain Therapeutics ( PTIE), JDSU ( JDSU), Regions Financial ( RF), Talisman Energy ( TLM), Transocean ( RIG), Advanced Micro Devices ( AMD), CBOT Holdings ( BOT), Nabors Industries ( NBR), Electronic Arts ( ERTS), Marvell Tech ( MRVL), Broadcom ( BRCM), Conexant Systems ( CNXT) and Ciena ( CIEN).


Cramer was bearish on Sirius Satellite Radio ( SIRI), Elan ( ELN), Xerox ( XRX), Northgate Minerals ( NXG), Petcob Animal Supplies ( PETC) and NutriSystem ( NTRI).

For more of Cramer's insights during the Lightning Round, click here .

Want more Cramer? Check out Jim's rules and commandments for investing from his latest book by clicking here.

Jim Cramer, host of the CNBC television program "Mad Money," is a Markets Commentator for, Inc., and CNBC, and a director and co-founder of All opinions expressed by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are his own and do not reflect the opinions of or its affiliates, or CNBC, NBC UNIVERSAL or their parent company or affiliates. Mr. Cramer's opinions are based upon information he considers to be reliable, but neither, nor CNBC, nor either of their affiliates and/or subsidiaries warrant its completeness or accuracy, and it should not be relied upon as such. Mr. Cramer's statements are based on his opinions at the time statements are made, and are subject to change without notice. No part of Mr. Cramer's compensation from CNBC or is related to the specific opinions expressed by him on "Mad Money."

None of the information contained in "Mad Money" constitutes a recommendation by Mr. Cramer, or CNBC that any particular security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy is suitable for any specific person. You must make your own independent decisions regarding any security, portfolio of securities, transaction, or investment strategy mentioned on the program. Mr. Cramer's past results are not necessarily indicative of future performance. Neither Mr. Cramer, nor, nor CNBC guarantees any specific outcome or profit, and you should be aware of the real risk of loss in following any strategy or investments discussed on the program. The strategy or investments discussed may fluctuate in price or value and you may get back less than you invested. Before acting on any information contained in the program, you should consider whether it is suitable for your particular circumstances and strongly consider seeking advice from your own financial or investment adviser.

Some of the stocks mentioned by Mr. Cramer on "Mad Money" are held in Mr. Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio. When that is the case, appropriate disclosure is made on the program and in the "Mad Money" recap available on The Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio contains all of Mr. Cramer's personal investments in publicly-traded equity securities only, and does not include any mutual fund holdings or other institutionally managed assets, private equity investments, or his holdings in, Inc. Since March 2005, the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio has been held by a Trust, the realized profits from which have been pledged to charity. Mr. Cramer retains full investment discretion with respect to all securities contained in the Trust. Mr. Cramer is subject to certain trading restrictions, and must hold all securities in the Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio for at least one month, and is not permitted to buy or sell any security he has spoken about on television or on his radio program for five days following the broadcast.

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