However, if WFI wins contracts to make more cities wireless, it may be those very relationships with telecom companies that present a problem. After all, they stand to lose revenue from broadband Internet subscriptions, which run as high as $50 a month, not to mention untold long-distance business as users learn to use VoIP lines to make phone calls over wireless networks.

Verizon protested Philadelphia's move to go wireless, but softened after it became clear that the state wouldn't allow many more cities to make similar moves. A bill is in the works in California to prevent cities from going wireless.

Even if cities manage to overcome the legislative hurdles facing municipal wireless zones, WFI will need to link them up without alienating some of its biggest current customers.
Please note that due to factors including low market capitalization and/or insufficient public float, we consider WFI to be a small-cap stock. You should be aware that such stocks are subject to more risk than stocks of larger companies, including greater volatility, lower liquidity and less publicly available information, and that postings such as this one can have an effect on their stock prices.

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