A July 28 story, " Mesa, Atlantic Coast Miss " incorrectly reported that Mesa's second-quarter financial results were half the year-ago total. In fact, the results were nearly double the year-ago total. In the same story, it was incorrectly reported that Atlantic Coast Airlines (ACAI:Nasdaq) had a loss of $45.7 million in last year's second quarter; in fact, it had a profit of $45.7 million. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 30.)

Due to a copyediting error, a July 23 story, " Eli Lilly Downgraded " incorrectly reported that Novartis is based in Sweden. In fact, it's based in Switzerland. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 28.)

A July 26 story, Intel Considering Cash Outlay, erroneously reported that Intel (INTC:Nasdaq) is authorized now to buy back 2.30 billion shares. In fact, the company has bought back 1.99 billion shares on an existing 2.30 billion-share buyback plan, leavving it room to repurchase around 300 million shares. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 26.)

A July 22 column, A Look at the Bear Case , inaccurately represented the thesis of independent institutional analyst Michael Belkin. He said that since the Nasdaq stopped dead at its 200-week moving average earlier this year, it has traced out the appearance of a market that simply had a bull-market rally in a secular bear market -- not a bear-market rally in a secular bull market, as originally represented in the piece. TheStreet.com regrets the confusion. ( Corrected July 23)

A July 22 story, Symantec Rallies on Strong Results , incorrectly stated Wall Street's revenue expectations for the company's upcoming October quarter. Analysts polled by Thomson First Call are expecting sales of $568.32 million, not $586.32 million. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 23.)

A July 21 story, ImClone Sinks Despite Profit, incorrectly stated that ImClone (IMCL:Nasdaq) failed to provide second-quarter sales data for its drug Erbitux. In fact, it did: Sales were $71.4 million in the period. TheStreet.com regrets the error. Corrected July 22)


A July 22 story, Caterpillar Slides on Miss , misstated the company's suggested full-year earnings outlook. The correct expectation is $5.63 to $5.79 a share, not $5.16 to $5.32 a share, which was previous guidance. The correct figure is above the current analyst expectation of $5.56 a share. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 22)


A July 21 story, STMicro Sales Miss Expectations , misstated the Thomson First Call consensus estimates for STMicro (STM:NYSE). Analysts expected second-quarter earnings of 16 cents an American depositary receipt on sales of $2.2 billion, not 14 cents a share on $2.01 billion as originally reported. Wall Street projected third-quarter earnings of 20 cents an ADR on sales of $2.31 billion, not 17 cents a share on $1.87 billion. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 22.)


A July 21 column by James Cramer, Bulls Can't Give Tech a Lift , did not disclose that he was long EMC (EMC:NYSE) at the time of publication. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 21.)

A July 5 story, Biotech 101: The Road to Approval, misstated the timing of a Food and Drug Administration request to Biopure (BPUR:Nasdaq) for additional studies on its human blood substitute Hemopure. The agency requested new studies in May 2003 and January 2004; it did not ask for additional studies in July 2003. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 21.)

A July 16 column by Jon Markman, Landstar Looks Good for the Long Haul , did not disclose Markman's long positions in Expeditors International (EXPD:Nasdaq), Whole Foods Market (WFMI:Nasdaq) and Starbucks (SBUX:Nasdaq). At the time of the column's publication, Markman was long all three stocks. TheStreet.com regrets the error. (corrected July 16)

A July 15 story, Rambus Charged by Earnings, misstated the terms of an intellectual property sharing agreement between Rambus (RMBS:Nasdaq) and Cadence (CDN:NYSE). Cadence won't pay Rambus, as originally reported; instead, Rambus will pay Cadence. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 16.)

A July 15 story, Fairchild Semi Swings to a Profit , misstated the company's year-ago second-quarter pro forma net income. The correct figure is $3.8 million, or 3 cents a share, not $21.4 million, or 17 cents a share. TheStreet.com regrets the error. (Corrected July 15).

A July 12 story, CyberGuard Chasing Secure Computer, misidentified the location of CyberGuard's (CGFW:Nasdaq) headquarters. It is Fort Lauderdale, Fla., not San Jose, Calif. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 13.)


Due to an editing error, a July 2 story, What if Kerry Wins? mistakenly described Lee Iacocca as former chairman of General Motors (GM:NYSE). In fact, he was chairman of Chrysler, now a unit of DaimlerChrysler (DCX:NYSE). TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 2.)


A July 1 Detox column, Freddie Numbers Cast Shadow Over Fannie , mistakenly calculated that the net guarantee assets at Fannie Mae (FNM:NYSE) and Freddie Mac (FRE:NYSE) were valued at 5.8% and 2.8% of their guaranteed mortgages, respectively. The column should have said the guarantee asset at Fannie was 0.58% of guaranteed mortgages and 0.28% at Freddie. TheStreet.com regrets the error. ( Corrected July 1.)


A July 1 column, Growth: Nobody Does It Like Sara Lee , contained several factual errors. The "Manage for Cash" section of the strategy table should have contained "Hosiery," not "Branded Apparel" as originally stated. Also, Sara Lee's Senseo product line will have $200 million in sales for fiscal 2004, not $100 million as originally reported. The company targets Senseo sales to reach $500 million by 2007, not $200 million by 2005. Finally, sales in the company's hosiery segment was cut in half over the past five years, not the past year as initially stated. TheStreet.com regrets the errors. ( Corrected July 1.)

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