Popular 80s Brands That Have All But Disappeared
Many did not make in out of the 80s.

It's been a pretty serious week of coverage for TheStreet.com as we roll out our Black Monday package "Crash of '87 -- TheStreet Special Report."

So to lighten the mood a little bit and leave you, the reader, with a little piece of nostalgia as we close out our coverage of the 30th anniversary of the Crash of '87 we are going to run through a handful of brands that had much of their heyday during the 1980s. 

While some are still in existence -- don't look now but Starter Jackets are making a comeback and Eastman Kodak Co. (KODK) and E.F. Hutton are actually still alive -- many did not make in out of the 80s.

How many of these dearly departed 80s brands do you recall? Or let's face it, how many of these brands remind you of their products collecting dust in your garage?

The "Crash of '87 -- TheStreet Special Report" is a series of stories, videos, graphics and other multimedia elements that look at the stock market crash of 1987, also known as Black Monday. TheStreet examines the cause of the crash, reveals some of the hottest stories of the day, and discovers what could cause a similar crash in the future. How can we prevent another Black Monday? Read more about the Crash of '87.

Crash of '87 - TheStreet Special Report
Originally published Oct. 20.

Coleco
Coleco

Once known for its popular video game consoles and Cabbage Patch Kids, Coleco Industries went bankrupt in 1988 and sold off its product lines and assets in 1989.

Colecovision launched in 1982 as the company's flagship gaming console and helped popularize games such as Donkey Kong from Nintendo  (NTDOY) . Other game titles for the once popular system were "Star Wars The Arcade Game," "Turbo" and "Zaxxon" the latter two which were made by Sega.

You can still find the system for sale on eBay for anywhere from $60 to $200-plus depending on the number of games.

Spuds MacKenzie
Spuds MacKenzie

Lovable pup Spuds MacKenzie was the Bud Light mascot that appeared in a Bud Light Super Bowl XXI ad in 1987. She quickly rose to fame and was retired in 1989, appearing as a ghost in Super Bowl LI Bud Light commercial.

Budweiser began in 1876 and in 2008 InBev (BUD) bought a majority stake Anheuser-Busch and in 2016 it merged with SABMiller.  

Bally Total Fitness
Bally Total Fitness

Bally Manufacturing in 1983 purchased an exercise manufacturer, and by 1987 it was the world's larger owner and operator of fitness centers, eventually consolidating all of its fitness centers under the name 'Bally Total Fitness' in 1995.

Bally began selling off its clubs in 2011 and the last Bally location closed in October 2016.

Prozac
Prozac

Prozac (fluoxetine) is an antidepressant developed by Eli Lilly & Co. (LLY)  that entered the market in 1986.

It was heavily referenced in popular culture (does the book and movie 'Prozac Nation' ring a bell?) and was one of the more prevalent SSRIs (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).

Antidepressants hit peak sales of $15 billion in 2003 but have stagnated dramatically thanks to much cheaper, generic versions of Celexa, Lexapro, Zoloft and Prozac hitting the market. Even though much more people are on antidepressants now the number of psychopharmacological drugs research programs in larger drug companies has shrunk by 70% in the past decade.

Eastman Kodak Co.
Eastman Kodak Co.

Eastman Kodak Co., more commonly referred to as Kodak, was founded in 1888 and was the dominant force in photographic film for decades. Kodak filed for bankruptcy in 2012, blaming in part the overwhelming shift to digital photography, and now operates on a much smaller scale.

The company trades on the NYSE under the ticker (KODK) , and has a market capitalization of $297.42 million.

At its peak in 1996, the company was the fifth most valuable company in the world with revenue reaching nearly $16 billion, compared to $16 million in 2016.

The Wiz
The Wiz

The Wiz was a chain of electronics stores and a major sponsor of local New York sports. After expanding significantly, it filed for bankruptcy in 1998 and was purchased by Cablevision (now part of French billionaire Patrick Drahi's Altice)  for $80 million and closed in 2003.

Drexel Burnham Lambert
Drexel Burnham Lambert

Once a major investment banking firm, Drexel Burnham Lambert was forced into bankruptcy in 1990 because of illegal involvement in the junk bond market.

In its heyday the company was a powerhouse on Wall Street and in the high-risk, high-reward world of junk bonds, a field Drexel employee Michael Milken helped pioneer.

Despite the high profile indictment of Milken in 1989, the investment professional was an integral part of the 1980s from a finance persepective.

Among the various deals Milken helped underwrite during this time were T. Boone Pickens' failed runs at Gulf Oil and Unocal, Carl Icahn's bid for Phillips 66, Ted Turner's buyout of MGM, and Kohlberg Kravis Roberts LP's  (KKR) successful bid for RJR Nabisco. KKR & Co. is the company's official name these days. 

Paine Webber and Co.
Paine Webber and Co.

PaineWebber and Co. was founded in 1880 and was acquired by UBS AG in 2000, making UBS the top wealth and asset management firm in the world.

Kidder, Peabody & Co.
Kidder, Peabody & Co.

Kidder, Peabody & Co. was an investment bank that was established in 1865, sold to General Electric Co. (GE) in 1986 and then to PaineWebber in 1994, ultimately becoming part of UBS when PaineWebber was acquired in 2000.

The 1980s for Kidder Peabody was interesting time as the firm continued to advise on mergers and acquisitions as well as other investing initiatives.

The firm was heavily featured in "Den of Thieves" by James B. Stewart, which laid out, among other things, the scandal involving former Kidder director Martin A. Siegel. On Feb. 13, 1987, Siegel pleaded guilty to one of to one count of conspiracy to violate the securities laws and one count of tax evasion, according to the New York Times

Jordache
Jordache

Known in the 1970s through the early 1980s for its designer jeans, Jordache became less popular in the 1990s and was heavily discounted. Now Jordache has diversified into U.S. real estate and Israeli ventures as well as manufacturing private denim for brands like Gap Inc. (GPS) and Levi's.

Compaq
Compaq

Compaq was founded in 1982 and produced some of the first IBM PC compatible computers. The influential tech company was acquired by Hewlett-Packard in 2002 for $24.2 billion.

Today, the company is part of Hewlett-Packard Inc. (HPQ) , which separated from Hewlett-Packard Enterprises (HPE) in 2016 under the guide of CEO Meg Whitman. 

Wang Laboratories
Wang Laboratories

Wang Laboratories was founded in 1951 and during its heyday in the 1980s was making $3 billion a year and employed over 33,000 people. Wang filed for bankruptcy protection in 1992 and became part of CompuCom in 2008.

On Oct. 4, CompuCom announced it had agreed to be acquired by Office Depot Inc. (ODP) for about $1 billion.

Magnavox
Magnavox

The portable VHS recorder burst on to shelves in the 1980s.

Used to document everything from America's Funniest Home Videos to Marty McFly's trip back to the future, the portable VHS recorder helped provide a new generation of amateur filmmakers a convenient way to document their lives.

Notable manufacturers included RCA, JVC and Magnavox.

RCA and JVC are still around as is Magnavox though the companies are in slightly different forms than their 80s counterparts. Magnavox was an electronics company known for producing everything from the world's first home video game console toy to camcorders in the 1980s. The brand was acquired by Philips in 1974, but Philips discontinued the brand name in the 1990s after consumers began to lose interest in the Magnavox name.

Merry-Go-Round
Merry-Go-Round

Merry-Go-Round was a national clothing chain that flourished in the 1970s because of its fast fashion for teens and shut down in 1996 after it was unable to appeal to a new generation.

Pan Am
Pan Am

Pan American World Airways, more commonly referred to as Pan Am, was the largest international air carrier in the U.S. from 1927 until its bankruptcy in 1991. Poor branding resulting from a bombed flight over Scotland and rising oil prices from the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait ultimately did them in.

Investors brought back Pan Am in 1996, but after losing money Pan Am & Carnival Air Lines decided to merge in 1997. In 1998, Pan Am filed for Chapter 11 again and Guilford transportation acquired the Pan Am name & assets. Due to rising fuel costs, Pan Am ceased airline operations in 2008 but there are still train cars owned by Guilford Transportation bearing the Pan Am name. There are currently 16 major airlines operating in the U.S.

Yugo
Yugo

Yugo hit its peak sales in 1987 and was marketed in the United States from 1985−1992 by Malcolm Bricklin, with a total of 141,651 sold. The brand peaked at 48,812 cars sold in 1987 and fell to 1,412 in 1992.

Pontiac
Pontiac

Pontiac was introduced by General Motors Co. (GM) in 1926 and its Firebird model became iconic during the NBC series "Knight Rider" starring David Hasselhoff.

Though some will argue the most desirable year of the Trans Am, there is no denying its popularity in the 80s.

To some the car was the real star of Knight Rider, not The Hoff. Hasselhoff sold his original version of the car in 2014 for $150,000 in a charity auction.

GM would retire the Pontiac brand in 2009.

Crazy Eddie's
Crazy Eddie's

Crazy Eddie's was originally called ERS Electronics and began in 1971 in Brooklyn. In 1987, New Jersey started a federal grand jury investigation into the company and "Eddie" was eventually charged with federal securities violations and spent two years in prison. In 1989 the company declared bankruptcy and was liquidated.

Before Best Buy (BBY) , Walmart (WMT) , Target (TGT) and a slew of online options popped up, Crazy Eddie's, The Wiz and Sears (SHLD) were to go-to stores for electronics. 

Starter Clothing
Starter Clothing

Starter Clothing makes nostalgic throwback clothing from major league sports teams and had licensing agreements with the NBA, NFL and NHL. In the mid-1990s it began to decline and the Starter name was purchased in 1999 by holding companies Official Starter Properties and Official Starter that were purchased by Nike Inc. (NKE) in 2004.

Nike recently landed a contract to be the official supplier of NBA jerseys through the 2026 season.

Bear Stearns
Bear Stearns

Bear Stearns was the fifth-largest investment bank when it collapsed in 2008 during the housing crisis and saw much of its heyday in the 1980s as a major trader in the nascent field of mortgage-backed securities.

Since becoming one of the largest traders of mortgage products in 1980s, Bear Stearns would continue to lead the field in terms of volume trades for the better part of two decades. 

Bouyed for years by a strong U.S. economy, Bear Stearns began to run into trouble in the mid-2000s as the U.S. mortgage industry headed toward collapse. On March 14, 2008, Bear Stearns was sold to JPMorgan Chase & Co.  (JPM)  for $2 a share. The price was raised to $10 per share days later, though still a far cry from the $30 per share closing price the bank enjoyed just a week prior.

Bear Stearns was founded in 1923 by Joseph Ainslee Bear, Robert B. Stearns and Harold C. Mayer Sr.

E.F. Hutton
E.F. Hutton

E.F. Hutton was a brokerage firm founded in 1904 and was the second-largest brokerage firm in the country for decades, known for its "When E. F. Hutton talks, people listen" commercial in the 1980s. After the 1987 crash, it merged with Shearson Learman and the remains are now part of Morgan Stanley Wealth Management.

Now, 30 years later, the grandson of founder Edward F. Hutton, Stanley Hutton Rumbough, and a new management team are bringing the E.F. Hutton name back to life for a generation accustomed to using handheld devices for everything from grocery shopping to watching TV. 

The move affords the news media an almost irresistible opportunity to ask whether customers will still listen when E.F. Hutton speaks, a question the company plans to take advantage of, later this year, with an E.F. Hutton smartphone.

It is important to note that the new E.F. Hutton America is a different legal entity than the E.F. Hutton of the 1980s.

More on E.F. Hutton: E.F. Hutton Wants Investors to Listen Again

This piece is part of series, "Crash of '87 -- TheStreet Special Report" meant to examine, dissect and learn from the stock market crash of 1987, also known as Black Monday. Through a number stories, videos, graphics and other multimedia elements TheStreet takes a look at the cause of the 1987 stock market crash, looks back at some of the hottest stories of the day and looks forward to what could cause a similar crash in the future. Read More about the Crash of '87.

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