Italy Dominates the Fancy Food Show, but Lithuania, Jordan and Even New Jersey Have a Presence

If you crave a traditional meat and potatoes dinner, head to your local Kroger (KR) .

But if salmon jerky, Chinese jelly or edible algae are among your hankerings, then a Whole Foods Market (WFM) , Fairway Market (FWM) or going online to Amazon Inc. (AMZN)  is what may be able to deliver your desired sustenance. 

All of that and some 180,000 other products from known companies like Welch Foods Inc., selling grapeseed oil, and foreign vendors like Jabri, offering sweets from Jordan, were hawked at the Summer Fancy Food Show in New York City, from Sunday, June 25, till Tuesday, June 27, at the Javits Center, for retailers and restaurateurs to sample. 

At the three-day event, foods and products in 2,600 booths from 46 countries and 44 states were represented, drawing more than 25,000 buyers, retailers, exhibitors and press.

"Fancy," of course, is code word for expensive. So, the show's offerings may not be found at your local Walmart Stores Inc. (WMT) either.

Italy rules the show, but New Jersey?
Italy rules the show, but New Jersey?
Gotta love the Jersey spirit?

The Italian words for tomato sauce are salsa di pomodoro. But in the Northeast, many Italian Americans call the red sauce you add to pasta, gravy. This Garden State vendor Original Jersey Italian Gravy struck on that colloquialism to christen its pasta sauce.

Meanwhile, the mother country, Italy, dominated the Fancy Food Show with 30,000 square feet of space, touting all manner of olive oils, pastas, canned tomatoes and sauces, cheeses, vinegars and sweets.

Buon appetito!

Bittermilk for the sweetest of cocktails.
Bittermilk for the sweetest of cocktails.
Mixers for the impatient drinker.

This Charleston, S.C., company called Bittermilk is owned by a husband and wife and claims to take the guesswork out of mixing cocktails by using its pre-made concoctions to which you add spirits. Each of the products uses a bittering agent, sweetener and acid.

Groceries, liquor stores and distilleries sell the mixers, which go for between $15 and $19 a bottle.

The salt that transforms your cooking.
The salt that transforms your cooking.
The color is soothing, but the flavor is explosive.

If you're a Morton salt user, or even, a sea salt fan, you'll be blown away by how much better your dishes taste when made with Himalayan pink salt. This product, which comes from the world's oldest salt mine in Kherwa, Pakistan, is sold online by Himalayan Chef.

It's a bubbly Bai.
It's a bubbly Bai.
Lime gives them the kick.

This eight-year-old brand has introduced a carbonated version of its antioxidant-infused fruit drinks. The brand was bought by Dr. Pepper Snapple Group (DPS) for $1.7 billion last year.

The perfect ending to a Middle Eastern meal.
The perfect ending to a Middle Eastern meal.
Jabri display at Fancy Foods show.

These supersweet Arab desserts are infused with honey and also made with light pastry dough and vermicelli and nuts, such as pistachios and cashews, as well as sesame seeds and chocolate. They come from Subhi Jabri & Sons Co., an Amman, Jordan, company that opened in 1935.

Maple syrup that's Runamok.
Maple syrup that's Runamok.
These syrups have umph!

This Vermont-based company called Runamok Maple features an array of syrups with one aged in bourbon barrels and others infused with elderberry, markut lime-leaf, cinammon and vanilla, and hibiscus. 

Fire up the griddle!

Go long, on your chips, that is.
Go long, on your chips, that is.

Behold, Pernes' Long Chips, from a Latvian company, where eating the long version of potato chips is a tradition. Who knew?

The potatoes are fried for 10 seconds in rapeseed oil. Flavors include bacon, horseradish, paprika, tomato and wasabi, in addition to the original unflavored one.

No corkscrew required for this wine.
No corkscrew required for this wine.
Mancan's red wine and white wine with fizz.

Mancan, Wine in a Can, takes the fuss out of drinking wine. This Ohio company uses California wines for its three different varieties--red, white and fizzy white--and packages them in a 12-ounce can, just the way Coke, from the Coca-Cola Co.  (KO)  does.

Cheers.

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