Intel Blows Away Estimates -- Here Are 11 Photos Revealing How Company Is Shaping the Future
AI in action.

Intel (INTC - Get Report) is being reborn, and it's a matter of time before investors really appreciate it. 

Shares of Intel jumped higher in after hours trading on Thursday after the tech titan reported stronger-than-expected second-quarter financial results and raised guidance for the rest of the year.

For the quarter, Intel posted adjusted earnings of 72 cents a share, topping analysts' projections for 68 cents a share. Revenue of $14.8 billion, beating estimates for $14.41 billion.

"Q2 was an outstanding quarter with revenue and profits growing double digits over last year," said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO. "We also launched new Intel Core, Xeon and memory products that reset the bar for performance leadership, and we're gaining customer momentum in areas like AI and autonomous driving. With industry-leading products and strong first-half results, we're on a clear path to another record year."

Intel supercharged its self-driving car initiative with the $14.7 billion purchase of MobilEye NV (MBLY) announced in March. CFO Bob Swan said that Intel plans to close the purchase in the third quarter.

The outlook for the rest of the year has picked up. For the third-quarter, Intel expects EPS of 80 cents versus the consensus of 74 cents. Third-quarter revenue is projected to be $15.7 billion, versus the consensus of $15.3 billion.

Intel raised its full-year 2017 revenue guidance by $1.3 billion to $61.3 billion, and upped its non-GAAP earnings forecast by 15 cents to $3.00 per share.

Here is how the company is powering the future.

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Speeding Up Artificial Intelligence
Speeding Up Artificial Intelligence

Intel is developing artificial intelligence and increasing the speed at which machines learn. The technology is being used to discover how the human genome functions, understand consumer behavior and build systems for purchase recommendations, image recognition and fraud prevention, according to its website. With the National Center for Missing an Exploited Children, Intel also seeks to take reports of child abuse and pornography, identify from where they came, and make the reports available to the appropriate law enforcement agency.

Making the Virtual a Reality
Making the Virtual a Reality

Intel's Core i7 processor can produce 360-degree graphics, and its TrueVR can put users in a sports arena or concert hall. And at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Intel, as the games' newest sponsor, will provide the virtual reality and 3D experience live at the Olympics for the first time.

Developing Autonomous Driving
Developing Autonomous Driving

In the second half of 2017, Intel is working with BMW AG and newly acquired Mobileye N.V. to bring 40 autonomous vehicles on the road. Intel's goal is to help bring autonomous series into production by 2021.

Intel GO automated driving solutions offer technologies to balance performance and power. The Intel GO system uses sensors to undestand the surrounding environment, create a path and make decisions on the road.

Identifying Risks for Disease Early
Identifying Risks for Disease Early

With a focus on collecting genomic and biomedical data, researchers can better understand disease and find ways to fight illness. Using that data with analytics and machine learning can help to identify the individuals who are most at risk with 80% accuracy, according to a video from Intel.

Droning On and On
Droning On and On

Intel's drones can help to survey land and capture images and thermal graphics for inspections. They can also help with surveying land for construction projects. Farmers could use them to find irrigation breaks and predict crop yields, and multispectral sensors can help monitor water use and fertilization.

Giving Retailers a Digital Advantage
Giving Retailers a Digital Advantage

According to a promotional video, retailers lose $1 trillion in inventory distortion worldwide. Intel's Responsive Retail Platform helps to track inventory's location in stores more accurately and in real time. It can provide insights to customer's patterns as well as inventory locations and store layout for experiences that are personal.

Powering Smart Homes
Powering Smart Homes

Intel's smart home project seeks to use sensors to track important objects like family documents, medicine prescriptions and smart phones. They would also be able to detect when there is a plumbing problem and use facial recognition to know when residents come home. A smart house could also control the thermostat, lock the doors and windows, close the blinds, turn on and off lights and activate a security system.

A Bright Idea
A Bright Idea

Intel sensors in LED light bulbs can measure humidity and temperature as well as capture sound and images. When those lights are used street lampposts, they can provide metadata, including counts of people, their speed and their direction.

Such information could help cities manage pedestrian flow, decrease accidents and monitor air quality, according to iQ. Real-time data could also help people find parking and assist with traffic control. In manufacturing, the lights could also help with safety conditions and efficiency.

Better Bicycling
Better Bicycling

Intel created the first bicycle-motocross smart bike, which has sensors that capture motion data from the handlebars and seat. The sensors can measure speed, spin degrees, number of flips and height and classify each move based on the bicycle's motion to help BMX riders perform their tricks.

Clothing Responds to Emotions
Clothing Responds to Emotions

Crafted with the Intel Curi module, a processor the size of a button, the adrenaline dress by Chromat uses sensors to detect when a person feels stressed. When the garment senses adrenaline, it extends a framework that creates an imposing shape like fight-or-flight responses in nature. Such technology works toward personalizing clothing based on people's feelings and environment.

Powering eSports
Powering eSports

As the new global technical partner of ESL, the world's largest eSports competition organizer, Intel will provide computers and processors to all participating teams and players. The tech company will power all of ESL's amateur and professional gaming. The deal is the largest multi-event agreement in eSports history, according to a news release.

Intel is also sponsoring an eSports grand slam, offering a $1-million prize to the first team that wins four of 10 Counter-Strike: Global Offensive competitions held by ESL and DreamHack. Plus, it is teaming with Oculus VR (OVTZ)  to create a Virtual Reality Challenger League with a prize pool of more than $200,000. It is a new eSports league centered on the new virtual-reality games The Unspoken from Insomniac Games and Echo Arena from Ready at Dawn.

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