These Major Tech Disasters Should Make You Want to Wait to Buy the Amazon Echo Show
Amazon Show.

Let's get one thing straight right now, Amazon's (AMZN - Get Report) new touchscreen-equipped Echo Show is cool.

On Tuesday, the e-commerce and tech giant released the latest iteration of its Echo digital assistant device. The Echo Show, priced at $299.99, features a five-megapixel camera and high-grade Dolby speakers, so consumers can not only ask voice-assistant Alexa questions, they can see the information they're seeking such as news and weather updates. The device can even be used as a security camera.

Amazon said the Echo Show is available for pre-order now for a June 28 shipping date. But, any smart tech buyer knows, sometimes it pays to wait.

While it's easy to get caught up in the hype of a new gadget, any tech device is hard to master on the first launch. We undoubtedly live in an advanced age, but even so, with gadgets come glitches, so waiting for a company to work past some of those initial bugs may be the best bet.

Here's a look back at some of the highest profile tech fails.

 

The Superbowl LI Fiasco
The Superbowl LI Fiasco

During this year's Super Bowl, when 113.7 million viewers tuned in to watch the New England Patriots take down the Atlanta Falcons, people were surprised to find their Echo and Alphabet's Google (GOOGL - Get Report) Home devices began responding to the television when their respective commercials aired, causing lights to flash on and off and music to blast.

While the glitch ended in some hilarious memes and memories, both Amazon and Google said they were developing systems to disable voice activation triggered by television ads, although it is unclear how.

Jim Cramer and the AAP team hold a position in Alphabet for their Action Alerts PLUS Charitable Trust Portfolio. Want to be alerted before Cramer buys or sells GOOGL? Learn more now.

Hello, Barbie Nightmare House
Hello, Barbie Nightmare House

This past Christmas morning, parents across the U.S. who purchased Mattel's (MAT - Get Report) app-controlled, voice-monitored Barbie Hello Dreamhouse - users can control the functions of the house by voice command - were far from satisfied. When children went to play with the high-tech doll house, they were greeted with an "Error Code 18" message, which turned out to be a wireless network issue that disabled the voice control.

Twitter user @jimmymcarthur wrote, "A true modern Christmas. I'm tweeting @ToyTalk and @Barbie about my problems with our Dreamhouse wifi. WTF kind of world is this?"

The company behind the technology for the doll house, ToyTalk, responded to the complaints in a statement at the time that advised users to turn the Barbie Hello Dreamhouse off for 15 seconds and then power it back up.

Samsung Sells Explosive Phones
Samsung Sells Explosive Phones

Last year, hundreds of people who plugged in their Samsung Electronics' Galaxy Note 7 to charge overnight, didn't wake up to a fully-powered phone, but one that was engulfed in flames. After receiving reports of overheated Galaxy Note 7 phones, Samsung was forced to recall all of the devices sold this past fall.

The company later found that the problem could be traced back to a flammable battery.

Apple Creates Map to Nowhere
Apple Creates Map to Nowhere

Surely no one can forget when Apple (AAPL - Get Report)  got rid of Google Maps in 2012 in lieu of its own map app, only to find that the replacement was literally trying to direct drivers into bodies of water. The i0S 6 Apple Maps actually marked one of New Zealand's main train stations in downtown Auckland as being located in the middle of a harbor.

Apple CEO Tim Cook offered a rare apology at the time. 

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The Apple iPhone Launch Itself
The Apple iPhone Launch Itself

Speaking of Apple, the launch of the first iPhone in 2007 wasn't exactly spectacular. In 2013, on the second anniversary of former CEO and Apple products pioneer Steve Jobs' death, the New York Times wrote an expose on the original iPhone, and it wasn't pretty.

The Times said when Jobs presented the revolutionary iPhone in January 2007, six months before it actually went to market, it was littered with bugs. The phone couldn't play a full song, it had multiple Internet connection issues and some even had gaps between the screen and the plastic edge.

Editor's Pick: Originally published May 9.

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