10 Biggest Gas Guzzlers on the Road in 2017

Editors' pick: Originally published Feb. 7.

No, diving gas prices aren't doing wonders for fuel economy in the United States.

In 2012, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Department of Transportation set a new fleet-wide fuel-efficiency standard of 54.5 miles per gallon for new U.S. vehicles starting in 2025. That made automakers figure out how to make pickup trucks stop guzzling gas, how to slim down fuel consumption in musclebound sports cars and how to build electric vehicles to rival Tesla's electric range. Even as a new administration came into office in 2017, the EPA stuck with that goal for fuel economy.

However, the average fuel economy (window-sticker value) of new vehicles sold in 2016 was 25.2 mpg, according to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. That's less than halfway to that 2025 goal, but it beats the roughly 19 miles per gallon that the Department of Transportation measured for all U.S. vehicles in 1995. It's also nearly double the average mileage of the light-duty vehicles on U.S. roads in 1980. It's also down from 25.4 in 2014 ad 25.3 in 2015.

When that fuel standard was put into place, gas prices were $4 per gallon nationwide. Now, according to AAA, they're little more than $2.27. That's given the nation an appetite for gas-guzzling automobiles. Automakers sold more than 6.7 million sport utility vehicles and crossovers last year. While just 1.8 million of those were the gas-swilling truck-based SUVs that rose to prominence in the '90s and early 2000s, more efficient car-based crossovers saw sales grow twice the rate of standard SUVs year-over-year.

While both standard SUVs and crossovers combined still fell short of the number of cars sold during the same span (7 million), sales of cars of every size were down 8.1% since 2015. Meanwhile, even minivan sales are up 8% within the last year. Though luxury car sales are down, folks who pay an average of $94,000 for a high-end luxury car or $97,000 for a high-end performance car -- based on Kelley Blue Book's January transaction prices -- aren't helping the push for better fuel economy. In fact, they're part of a low-end of the spectrum that's dragging down the entire auto market.

With a lot of help from the Department of Energy's FuelEconomy.gov, we found the ten least-fuel-efficient vehicles that money can buy. If your idea of luxury and high performance centers around burning as many fossil fuels as possible, here are the vehicles of your dreams:

10. Midsize SUV: 2017 Nissan Murano
10. Midsize SUV: 2017 Nissan Murano

Starting price: $29,740

Combined miles per gallon: 24

It's nice nice to have the Bluetooth and streaming audio, a 3.5-liter DOHC 24-valve V6 engine and dual zone climate control standard. It's fantastic to have nearly 70 cubic feet of maximum storage. It would be nicer if it didn't cost $8,000 more for the SL and then $2,260 more for a technology package to get safety features including intelligent cruise control, emergency braking, driver attention alerts, moving object detection, rear traffic alerts, Nissan Connect emergency services/navigation, the Around View camera and collision warning. Also, if you wanted the hybrid model that increased combined mileage to 30 mpg back in 2016, it was $10,000 more expensive than the base model.

9. Small SUV: Infiniti QX50
9. Small SUV: Infiniti QX50

Starting price: $34,650

Combined miles per gallon: 20

This tiny crossover is an entry-level gas guzzler but still not great on gas

The Infiniti QX50 got its most recent upgrade in 2015 that stretched its wheelbase, created substantially more rear legroom and extended the cargo space a bit. That said, 50 cubic feet with the seats down is still tiny for a crossover. However, it does have the Around View exterior camera system, navigation, wood-and-leather interior and available all-wheel drive. It's also a crossover with a 325-horsepower V6 and suspension straight out of the Nissan 370Z. If you need a grocery getter but don't want to sacrifice speed, this is one of your better options for the price.

8. Subcompact: 2017 Bentley Continental GT
8. Subcompact: 2017 Bentley Continental GT

Starting price: $218,400

Combined miles per gallon: 15

That GT designation is costly, but it's because this class of buyer knows exactly what it's looking for.

In the Continental, it's a 590-horsepower, 6-liter, 12-cylinder engine and performance all-wheel drive above all else. The 1950s throwback body, Breitling gauges with blood orange lighting, soft-touch leather, sport pedals, large-screen infotainment system and bespoke Naim sound system with 15-gigabyte just make it all look pretty.

7. Subcompact: 2017 Maserati GranTurismo Convertible
7. Subcompact: 2017 Maserati GranTurismo Convertible

Starting price: $145,740

Combined miles per gallon: 15

You're not going to want to race anyone in this GT.

This convertible GT is good for little else than being seen. It's a massive four-seater convertible with leather trim, multi-zone automatic climate control and a sprawling multimedia/navigation system. However, even with that six-figure price tag, buyers are getting a 4.7-liter V8 that's not only relatively underpowered at 444 horsepower, but somehow manages to be less efficient than its 12-cylinder counterparts.

6. Large vehicle: 2016 Rolls Royce Phantom
6. Large vehicle: 2016 Rolls Royce Phantom

Starting price: $417,825

Combined miles per gallon: 14

The new, aluminum-based version won't debut until 2018, but it's clear why this vehicle is getting lighter. While each Phantom starts with a 453-hp 6.8-liter V12 engine that goes from zero to 60 mph in less than eight seconds, the car is also incredibly heavy.

In its last incarnation, the Phantom was built to weigh nearly three tons. There's a whole lot of wood, leather, tech features, armor and other assorted features that the Rolls Royce bespoke team is more than happy to add at a customer's whim. None of that helped fuel economy, but it all created an experience that buyers had a hard time replicating with other companies. When you pay for a Rolls Royce, you're paying for a personal statement. That statement's just going to be a bit lighter in future years.

5. Midsize: 2017 Bentley Mulsanne
5. Midsize: 2017 Bentley Mulsanne

Starting price: $310,000

Combined miles per gallon: 13

This is the flashiest Bentley you can own, which is an important distinction when lesser Bentleys are finished off with parts from within its Volkswagen AG parent company.

Bentley owners in this range don't want a repackaged Audi or Porsche: They want the 6.8-liter, 8-cylinder engine, the more than 100 paint colors, nearly two dozen carpet colors, nine wood veneers, 24 leathers, Naim custom sound system, Champagne bottle cooler, duck-down cushions, massaging seats, picnic tables, Bluetooth headphones and privacy curtains. They want the faster Speed version and a larger incarnation with an extended frame. They want and all-British Bentley, which you can't make out of German parts.

4. Minicompact: 2017 Ferrari GTC4Lusso
4. Minicompact: 2017 Ferrari GTC4Lusso

Starting price: $300,000

Combined miles per gallon: 13

You're talking about a 6.3-liter, 680-horsepower V12 with all-wheel drive and a body that looks less like a Ferrari station wagon that its predecessor -- the four-seat, rear-entertainment-screen-having, stroller-lugging FF. That said, the sleek frame hides rear seating that's actually more spacious than the FF's was. It's supposed to the the everyday, family Ferrari, but we're glad to see the Prancing Pony drift away from a more commuter-oriented look and go back to its roots. With all-wheel drive built specifically to handle snow and its 15.9 cubic feet of trunk space (and 28.3 cubic inches of maximum cargo space), it's still useful without being utilitarian.

3. Two-seater: 2016 Ferrari F12 tdf
3. Two-seater: 2016 Ferrari F12 tdf

Starting price: $330,000

Combined miles per gallon: 12

There were all of 799 of these made, and that 769-horsepower V12 engine made it incredibly sought after by Ferrari loyalists.

The F12 tdf is street-legal by the narrowist of margins. Its carbon-fiber has no glove compartment, and its interior is spare as can be. Ferrari Chairman Luca di Montezemolo sold all of them through word of mouth last year and made his notoriously selective brand even more exclusive by making a car for only its most high-profile, well-heeled loyalists. If you aren't willing to start with a California T entry-level model and work your way up, you're going to have to wait for an F12 to come up at auction in a few years.

2. Two-seater: 2016 Lamborghini Aventador Roadster
2. Two-seater: 2016 Lamborghini Aventador Roadster

Starting price: $399,500

Combined miles per gallon: 12

A carbon-fiber-and-aluminum convertible with a roughly 730-horsepower, 6.5-liter V12 engine seems an unlikely candidate for a convertible, but Lamborghini gives the people what they want.

However, with a top speed of 217 miles per hour, it would take you a little more than three minutes of pinning the speedometer to go through a gallon of gas. That isn't likely to be foremost in your mind when you take off the two 13-pound carbon fiber roof panels and show off what this road-legal racer can do, but it's tough to ignore when you spend big swaths of your drive at the pump. An Aventador isn't made for preening along some packed city street -- it wants and open road and forgiving speed limits. Give it both.

1. Two-seater: 2016 Aston Martin V12 Vantage S
1. Two-seater: 2016 Aston Martin V12 Vantage S

Starting price: $186,295

Combined miles per gallon: 12

Want to hit 60 mph in 4.2 seconds and top out at 205? This 565-horsepower brute will get you there for roughly half the cost of the Lamborghini with a somewhat curvier look. Its updated satellite navigation system, standard Bluetooth, text message integration and apps including Apple CarPlay also make it friendlier for the daily commute than the average supercar. It's a bit more fierce than James Bond's brand tends to be, but that light chassis and big engine mean business.

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