BOSTON (

MainStreet

) -- The grim prospect for aging New Yorkers: One-third of them won't have enough money to retire comfortably.

That's according to

a study

released Thursday by New York City Comptroller John C. Liu and the

Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis

at The New School in Greenwich Village.

One-third of New Yorkers won't have enough money to retire comfortably, according to a study released Thursday.

Using city and state data, it found that two-thirds of workers in the city -- more than 2 million people -- in 2009 did not participate in employer-sponsored retirement plans, largely because their employer did not offer one. Between 2000-09, the percentage of employees in New York City who had access to employer-sponsored retirement plans declined from 48% to 40%. That is below the 2009 U.S. average of 53%.

More than one-third of New York City households in which the head is near retirement age will have to subsist almost entirely on Social Security income or will not be able to retire at all due to the fact that they have less than $10,000 in savings, according to the researchers.

The study stresses that the "brewing retirement crisis cuts across racial, ethnic and gender lines."

"The deck is becoming increasingly stacked against New Yorkers in their efforts to retire," SCEPA Director Teresa Ghilarducci said in a statement. "Fewer New Yorkers have access to the convenience and affordability of employer-sponsored retirement plans. More and more residents now face a choice between retiring into poverty or continuing to work in old age. Without significant policy reforms, the economic tea leaves foretell a decrease in the standard of living for retired New Yorkers."

The study data were drawn from the 2001 and 2010

Current Population Survey

, the 2008

Survey of Income and Program Participation

and the 2009 New York State Personal Income Tax Files.

--Written by Joe Mont in Boston.

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