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Here are some of the latest reports, surveys, and studies related to retirement, including research into home equity, home healthcare and the Social Security impersonation scam.

As retirees live longer, spend more on healthcare, and get less income replaced by Social Security, many may need to tap their home equity to be comfortable, according to a brief from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Authors Alicia H. Munnell, Abigail N. Walters, Anek Belbase and Wenliang Hou write: "For a comfortable retirement, many households may need to tap their home equity but, currently, few take out a reverse mortgage or defer their property taxes.One reason may be that, if they move during retirement, they would have to pay back the loan and could be left with inadequate resources late in life. However, the analysis finds that about half of households never move at all, most of the rest largely stay put, and only a small share move frequently. The bottom line: most older households exhibit enough residential stability to make tapping home equity viable."

Read more in Are Homeownership Patterns Stable Enough to Tap Home Equity?

More of the latest retirement-related research:

U.S. Senate Special Committee on Aging: There's No Place Like Home: Home Health Care in Rural America

National Institute on Aging: Improving Canada's Retirement Income System

International Longevity Centre: The 100-year family: Longer lives, fewer children

AARP Public Policy Institute: Shaping the Future of Digital Health: Key Themes Emerging from a Series of Roundtables on the Health Data Revolution

Kaiser Family Foundation: Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services Enrollment and Spending and Key State Policy Choices About Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services

U.S. Social Security Administration: Social Security Bulletin (Vol. 80, No. 1, February 2020)

Urban Institute: How Much Do Colorado Teachers Gain from the State Retirement System

International Longevity Centre: A fork in the road - The future of driving in an ageing society

Employee Benefit Research Institute: Retirement Plan Participation and the Current Population Survey: The Impact of New Income Questions on These Estimates

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: Fatal occupational injuries to older workers

Population Reference Bureau: Aging and Health in China: What Can We Learn From the World's Largest Population of Older People?

U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means: Legislative Proposals for Paid Family and Medical Leave

U.S. National Center for Health Statistics: Mortality in the United States, 2018

People's Pension: Measuring the ethnicity pensions gap

U.S. Special Committee on Aging Committee: That's Not the Government Calling: Protecting Seniors from the Social Security Impersonation Scam

Brookings Institution: Evidence-based retirement policy: Necessity and opportunity

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: CMS's Implementation of a 2014 Policy Change Resulted in Improvements in the Reporting of Coverage Gap Discounts Under Medicare Part D

U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services: Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) for Medicare Beneficiaries with Advanced Cancer

National Bureau of Economic Research: Should the Government be Paying Investment Fees on $3 Trillion of Tax-Deferred Retirement Assets?, The Employment Effects of the Social Security Earnings Test, and The State of Mental Health Among the Elderly Chinese

Here are some of the latest reports, surveys, and studies related to retirement, including research into home equity, home healthcare and the Social Security impersonation scam.

As retirees live longer, spend more on healthcare, and get less income replaced by Social Security, many may need to tap their home equity to be comfortable, according to a brief from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College. Authors Alicia H. Munnell, Abigail N. Walters, Anek Belbase and Wenliang Hou write: "For a comfortable retirement, many households may need to tap their home equity but, currently, few take out a reverse mortgage or defer their property taxes.One reason may be that, if they move during retirement, they would have to pay back the loan and could be left with inadequate resources late in life. However, the analysis finds that about half of households never move at all, most of the rest largely stay put, and only a small share move frequently. The bottom line: most older households exhibit enough residential stability to make tapping home equity viable."

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