Question: I turned 79 in December of 2019. Do I still continue to use the old IRS tables or will the new ones apply?

Answer: "Assuming that your question is referring to the age-based required minimum distribution (RMD) needed from an IRA or qualified retirement account," says Sean Bailey of Bailey Wealth Services, "the recently passed SECURE Act made many changes to retirement accounts distributions. However, the distribution tables were unaffected. You can use the same tables from last year."

These distributions, he says, are calculated using the Uniform Lifetime Table or, if your spouse is more than 10 years younger, the Joint Life Expectancy Table. "While neither table will change in 2020, there is a proposed change for 2021," he says. "Under executive order 13847, the Department of the Treasury and the IRS are proposing changes to both distribution tables for Jan. 1, 2021."

While the proposed result will be a reduction in the minimum distribution requirements, to reflect increased life expectancy assumptions, they have yet to be finalized, says Bailey.

Got questions about the new tax law, Social Security, Medicare, retirement, investments, or money in general? Email Robert.Powell@TheStreet.com. Kim McSheridan assisted with this report.

Question: I turned 79 in December of 2019. Do I still continue to use the old IRS tables or will the new ones apply?

Answer: "Assuming that your question is referring to the age-based required minimum distribution (RMD) needed from an IRA or qualified retirement account," says Sean Bailey of Bailey Wealth Services, "the recently passed SECURE Act made many changes to retirement accounts distributions. However, the distribution tables were unaffected. You can use the same tables from last year."

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