Question: When I applied for and started receiving Social Security, I wasn't sure if I got and received the right answer. I was married for more than 10 years and never remarried. My ex-husband receives the highest amount in benefits because he made a wonderful income. I worked but never made anywhere near the same amount. I applied at 62½ thinking I would get one-half. Instead, I got mine and only a tiny amount of his. How do I know if they made a mistake? I am now 67.

Answer: When you're eligible for both your own Social Security and an ex-spouse payment, the total payment is the higher of the two, with your own paid first, says Andy Landis, author of Social Security: The Inside Story, 2018 Silver Anniversary Edition.

Note: Both benefits would be reduced because they started before your full retirement age, or FRA. Read more about the impact of divorce from the Social Security Administration's Benefits Planner.

"Your payment sounds correct, but you can ask for an explanation by calling (800) 772-1213" says Landis. "You can wait on hold with a magazine or other diversion, or just leave a message for a callback."

More on this topic from Retirement Daily:

Gone But Not Forgotten: Social Security 'Ex-Spouse' Benefits

Here's how to contact the Social Security Administration by phone or email.

Got questions about the new tax law, Social Security, Medicare, retirement, investments, or money in general? Want to be considered for a Money Makeover? Email Robert.Powell@TheStreet.com.

Question: When I applied for and started receiving Social Security, I wasn't sure if I got and received the right answer. I was married for more than 10 years and never remarried. My ex-husband receives the highest amount in benefits because he made a wonderful income. I worked but never made anywhere near the same amount. I applied at 62½ thinking I would get one-half. Instead, I got mine and only a tiny amount of his. How do I know if they made a mistake? I am now 67.

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