Question: My husband, who was born in 1952, started collecting Social Security at age 65 in the amount of $495 per month. I am 62 and plan to work until age 70 if I am able.

My Social Security will be higher, about $1,700 per month, if I continue to work. I know they changed the changed the law about me claiming and suspending, but is there anything we can do to increase his now before I claim mine? We have even considered getting a divorce to see if that would help. I'm at a loss and the information I find on this is extremely contradictory and confusing.

Answer: Given your ages, you have two different sets of Social Security rules that apply to you, says Matthew Allen, the co-founder and CEO of Social Security Advisors.

Under one rule, because you were born after Jan. 2, 1954, you would have to file for (and not suspend) your Social Security benefits for your husband to receive any spousal benefits while you are married, says Allen. Read more about Voluntary Suspensions from the Social Security Administration here.

The other rule applies to divorced spouse benefits. "Assuming you had been married for at least 10 years, if you were to then get divorced, after a two-year period your husband would become 'independently entitled' which means that he could file for a Social Security ex-spousal benefit based on your record as an ex-spouse without you needing to file first," says Allen.

Other options to consider: Your husband, if able, could possibly increase his Social Security benefit by returning to work, adding to his earnings history, says Allen. Or, at age 66, he could suspend his benefits and begin to accumulate delayed retirement credits again which increases his benefit at the rate of 8% per year. "Your husband could then restart his benefits -- no later than 70 -- at the then higher rate," says Allen.

Got questions about the new tax law, Social Security, Medicare, retirement, investments, or money in general? Want to be considered for a Money Makeover? Email Robert.Powell@TheStreet.com.

Question: My husband, who was born in 1952, started collecting Social Security at age 65 in the amount of $495 per month. I am 62 and plan to work until age 70 if I am able.

My Social Security will be higher, about $1,700 per month, if I continue to work. I know they changed the changed the law about me claiming and suspending, but is there anything we can do to increase his now before I claim mine? We have even considered getting a divorce to see if that would help. I'm at a loss and the information I find on this is extremely contradictory and confusing.

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