Question: I need to know if I am eligible to collect my mother's Social Security. She has passed and had just started receiving her benefits. I'm her son.

Answer: It is highly unlikely you are able to receive Social Security benefits on your mother's record, says Joe Elsasser, a certified financial planner and president of Covisum.

"There are a few situations where it might be possible: If you are under 18, or under 19 but still in high school, or, if you are disabled and became disabled prior to age 22," he says.

Read Benefits for Children; Benefits For Children With Disabilities; Understanding Supplemental Security Income SSI For Children-- 2018 Edition; Benefits Planner: Disability ' How You Qualify; and Apply for Disability Benefits -- Child (Under Age 18).

Question: I retired at age 66 and started receiving my Social Security. I have continued to work part time. Should I receive any extra benefit for my extra Social Security contributions?

Answer: It is possible you will receive an increase based on the additional work, says Elsasser. "Social Security benefits are calculated based on your highest 35 years of adjusted earnings," he says. "If you have fewer than 35 years of work where you paid into Social Security, each additional year of work would replace a zero. Those raises can be sizeable."

If on the other hand, you have 35 years of considerably higher paying work (after adjusting all your past years wages based on average wages growth from then until now), then the taxes you pay are for naught -- and you won't get a raise, says Elsasser.

Read How Work Affects Your Benefits.

Got questions about the new tax law, Social Security, Medicare, retirement, investments, or money in general? Want to be considered for a Money Makeover? Email Robert.Powell@TheStreet.com. Kim McSheridan assisted with this report.

Question: I need to know if I am eligible to collect my mother's Social Security. She has passed and had just started receiving her benefits. I'm her son.

Answer: It is highly unlikely you are able to receive Social Security benefits on your mother's record, says Joe Elsasser, a certified financial planner and president of Covisum.

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