Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump Made $83 Million In 2017

While serving as unpaid advisors to the president, Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump took home $83 million in income and capital gains in 2017, according to financial disclosure forms the White House filed with the U.S. Office of Government Ethics. The forms showed that Kushner's debts have risen over the last year along with his income.

Kushner reported outstanding liabilities of between $27 million and $135 million and assets of $181 million in 2018, up from at least $140 million in assets last year. A portion of Kushner's increase in net worth came from the growth of his earnings from Cadre, a real estate technology startup he co-founded alongside his brother, to $25 million in 2018 from at least $5 million in 2018.

Ivanka Trump earned at least $5 million in 2018 from a $50 million trust that holds most of her companies. She also received a $2 million severance payment from the Trump Organization.

Though the forms only require senior White House officials to classify their assets and liabilities into wide categories, the forms still reveal a lot about the first family's finances, including that Ivanka Trump profited between $5 million and $25 million from her investment in the Trump International Hotel in Washington D.C. The hotel is at the center of a lawsuit filed by Washington D.C. and the state of Maryland alleging that President Trump has violated the Constitution's emoluments clause stating that presidents may not accept payments from foreign governments.

"Since joining the administration, Mr. Kushner and Ms. Trump have complied with the rules and restrictions as set out by the Office of Government Ethics," said Peter Mirijanian, a spokesman for the couple's ethics lawyer, Abbe Lowell, told the Associated Press. "As to the current filing which OGE also reviews, their net worth remains largely the same, with changes reflecting more the way the form requires disclosure than any substantial difference in assets or liabilities."

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