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Civil aviation authorities from nine nations and international bodies -- including Australia, China, Japan and the European Union -- have confirmed they'll join a review of the Boeing 737 MAX.

A team of international experts are slated to meet on April 29 for a review of the Boeing (BA - Get Report) 737 MAX to check fixes to the aircraft's automated flight system.

Civil aviation authorities from nine nations and international bodies -- including Australia, China, Japan and the European Union -- have confirmed they'll join in the so-called Boeing 737 MAX Joint Authorities Technical Review, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Earlier in April, the FAA created the review team, which has participants from NASA, the FAA, and other authorities. It's chaired by Chris Hart, a former head of the National Transportation Safety Board.

The Boeing 737 MAX was the same type of aircraft involved in the two fatal crashes in October and March over Indonesia and Ethiopia. Hundreds of passengers and crew were killed in the accidents. Since the accidents, authorities around the globe ordered the aircraft grounded, and airlines, such as American Airlines, have canceled flights with the jets through summer.

The review team "will conduct a comprehensive review of the certification of the aircraft's automated flight control system," said the FAA. The jet's automated flight control system will be scrutinized, as will the way in which pilots interact with the system. The team will evaluate whether the system complies with the nations' regulations and "identify future enhancements that might be needed," according to the FAA.

The review is expected to take about three months to complete.