Nobody ever heard of

Cyber-Care

(CYBR) - Get Report

until this month when my cohort

Martinez

(as in

Mark

) and I were the first to

question the quality of the company's orders and whether Cyber-Care itself was

in violation of

FDA

rules by taking orders for a new patient-monitoring device before receiving regulatory approval. Now the

Sun-Sentinel

in Ft. Lauderdale weighs in with a story saying that the FDA is investigating the company after receiving a complaint involving the very issues raised in this

column on May 2. Sure would've liked a little credit where credit was due to point out that the probe

follows

issues first made public in this col. But, hey, they mentioned us in the bowels of their story. (Beggars can't be choosers.) What, me petty? (And proud of it!) Onward ...

Economically speaking: The

Nazdak

has interest-rate j-j-j-jitters. How bad is inflation? In the wake of my first-person

piece on Palo Alto housing, I've heard from a number of Silicon Valley-ites telling me that housing prices have cooled in their neck of the woods. Then there's this, from

John Rock

, who's in the house-building biz in northern N.J.: "There are builders in the Saddle River area (Nixon's old haunt), who are sitting on homes they paid $1.5 million for with hopes of junking them and putting up $4.5 million models. The fact they can't get subcontractors has put their plans on hold. It's nuts. Perhaps a sign of the top?" Or a new bottom? Wake me when it's over ... Back to tech-land, where

June

writes: "This evening, coming up Sand Hill Road to the 280 Interstate (otherwise known as ground zero of VC-land) were two young fellows -- khaki and well-dressed, sitting on boxes with a sign that read, 'Will work for Funding -- $500K.'" Now

that's

the sign of a top.

Hotline hilarity: Last week, I

wrote, "Get yer facts straight before you clog up my email." To which,

Carsten Jansing

says, "I admire your work, but must you write like an Orc? ... That is disgusting." But, Carsten, it was just fer fun!

Food for thought: A Hotline

item last week on

PF Chang's

( PFCB) noted that some folks think it's too early to short a restaurant like that, which boasts four-hour-long lines in some locations. Oh yeah? At least, that's what

Marty Melnick

sounded like when he reminded me that people are still waiting hours to get into some

Rainforest Cafe

(RAIN)

restaurants. "Not the best indication of a financial success," he says. How true, how true. Just look at

its

stock ... or the stock of Silicon Valley's

Fresh Choice

(SALD)

. ... Flip side of the coin from

Joe Dittmark

(proudly of Austin, Texas) who writes: "Don't short these trendy, yet GOOD restaurants until the economy turns. Until that time, people will go out and eat A LOT ... Right now, Chang's is "the place to be seen" here in Austin, and that carries a premium right now." Using

Dell

(DELL) - Get Report

dollars, no doubt.

Speaking of which: If you wondered whether the gaming of this market is over (no, it isn't!), check out

Cramer's

recent hit on Dell. (It has

nothing

to do with fundamentals.) And speaking of Cramer, he's writing about

Deere!

John Deere

(DE) - Get Report

, as in farm equipment? What a hoot! Meanwhile, on its post-earnings conference call, Dell said it would earn something like $100 million from investment gains through the end of the year. Am I the only one wondering; how can they know

that

so far in advance? Especially in

this

market. Finally, little reaction (relatively speaking) to the Dell item in

my morning col ... Either it made tremendous sense (which I would like to think is the case) or, more likely, people are saying, "Enough already," which is what I think about this version of ... the Hotline.

Herb Greenberg writes daily for TheStreet.com. In keeping with TSC's editorial policy, he doesn't own or short individual stocks, though he owns stock in TheStreet.com. He also doesn't invest in hedge funds or other private investment partnerships. He welcomes your feedback at

herb@thestreet.com. Greenberg also writes a monthly column for Fortune.

Mark Martinez assisted with the reporting of this column.