The Urban Dictionary defines “foodie” as a person who enjoys eating food, which means, well, pretty much most people, depending on how hungry they are.

That makes food, and eating, a big industry: Americans will have spent about $863 billion eating out by the end of year, according to the National Restaurant Association, and the number continues to rise. Nationally, we spend more than $7,700 per year on groceries and going out.

To determine the best and cheapest foodie scenes, personal finance site WalletHub compared 182 U.S. cities across 30 key indicators of foodie-friendliness, using a more refined definition of “foodie” — “those who crave new and different flavors but also savor the exploratory experience of eating, learning and discovering food.”

WalletHub evaluated those dimensions using 30 relevant metrics; among them: the cost of groceries, restaurant accessibility and affordability, beer and wine prices, food, sales and restaurant taxes, the presence of Michelin-starred restaurants, and the number of food trucks, restaurants, coffee shops, ice cream shops, breweries, butcher shops and food festivals per capita.

Based on their study, these are the best cities for foodies in the U.S.

Portland, Ore. 

Portland, Ore. 

1. Portland, Ore.

  • Affordability rank: 13
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 5

Of 180 cities, Portland comes out on top, at No. 13 for affordability and No. 5 for quality, diversity and accessibility. It ties for first place among six cities for the most craft breweries and wineries per capita, and for most coffee shops. Above, a long line forms outside the famous Voodoo Donuts in Portland.

New York

New York

2. New York

  • Affordability rank: 175
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 1

New York makes up for its shortcomings in affordability by topping the list for the other metrics. New York ranks No. 1 for having the most gourmet specialty-food stores per capita, and the most restaurants per capita. It ties for first with six other cities for most coffee shops, and most ice cream and frozen yogurt shops. But New York is among the most expensive, along with places like Juneau, Ala. and Honolulu for overall affordability. New York is also one of five cities with the highest average beer and wine prices. Pictured is a shop in New York’s Little Italy neighborhood.

Miami

Miami

3. Miami

  • Affordability rank: 123
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 3

Miami is among five cities — New York, San Francisco, Las Vegas and Washington, D.C. — that have the most restaurants per capita. Above, food trucks line up in Miami’s North Bay Village for Food Truck Wednesday.

San Francisco

San Francisco

4. San Francisco

  • Affordability rank: 172
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 2

San Francisco is among five cities — New York, Miami, Las Vegas and Washington, D.C. — that have the most restaurants per capita. It ranks among the highest for the number of restaurants, gourmet specialty-food shops, coffee shops, and craft breweries and wineries — if you can afford it.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles

5. Los Angeles

  • Affordability rank: 107
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 4

Los Angeles is third for the number of gourmet specialty-food shops. Pictured is the Grand Central Market in downtown L.A.

The Gordon Ramsay steakhouse in Las Vegas

The Gordon Ramsay steakhouse in Las Vegas

6. Las Vegas

  • Affordability rank: 15
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 7

According to the numbers, Vegas is loaded with restaurants, ice cream shops and coffee shops.

San Diego

San Diego

7. San Diego

  • Affordability rank: 47
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 9

San Diego is another among the cities that tie for first place for most craft breweries and wineries per capita. The other cities are Santa Rosa, Calif., Portland Ore., Seattle, Denver and San Francisco.

Seattle

Seattle

8. Seattle

  • Affordability rank: 168
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 6

Despite its abundance of wineries and breweries, Seattle ranks among the most expensive for average beer and wine prices.

Chicago

Chicago

9. Chicago

  • Affordability rank: 103
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 8
Austin, Texas

Austin, Texas

10. Austin, Texas

  • Affordability rank: 17
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 15
Orlando, Fla.

Orlando, Fla.

11. Orlando, Fla.

  • Affordability rank: 48
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 11
Sacramento, Calif.

Sacramento, Calif.

12. Sacramento, Calif.

  • Affordability rank: 77
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 14
Tampa, Fla.

Tampa, Fla.

13. Tampa, Fla.

  • Affordability rank: 86
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 13
Atlanta

Atlanta

  • 14. Atlanta
  • Affordability rank: 78
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank:
Denver

Denver

15. Denver

  • Affordability rank: 84
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 17
Charleston, S.C.

Charleston, S.C.

16. Charleston, S.C.

  • Affordability rank: 61
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 19
Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

Georgetown, Washington, D.C.

17. Washington, D.C.

  • Affordability rank: 171
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 12

In the affordability category, Washington, D.C. ranks among the worst for high beer and wine prices.

Honolulu

Honolulu

18. Honolulu

  • Affordability rank: 178
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 10

Another of the most pricey cities, Honolulu offers a high number of gourmet specialty-food shops.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia

19. Philadelphia

  • Affordability rank: 88
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 20
Oakland, Calif.

Oakland, Calif.

20. Oakland, Calif.

  • Affordability rank: 155
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 16
Houston

Houston

21. Houston

  • Affordability rank: 21
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 25

Houston is affordable for foodies, especially those who cook at home: it ranks No. 4 for lowest cost of groceries.

Richmond, Va.

Richmond, Va.

22. Richmond, Va.

  • Affordability rank: 30
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 22
San Antonio

San Antonio

23. San Antonio

  • Affordability rank: 1
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 44
Cincinnati

Cincinnati

24. Cincinnati

  • Affordability rank: 14
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 30
Grand Rapids, Mich.

Grand Rapids, Mich.

25. Grand Rapids, Mich.

  • Affordability rank: 5
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 40
Milwaukee

Milwaukee

26. Milwaukee

  • Affordability rank: 9
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 43
Columbus, Ohio

Columbus, Ohio

27. Columbus, Ohio

Affordability rank: 8

Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 42

Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh

28. Pittsburgh

  • Affordability rank: 74
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 21
Rochester, N.Y.

Rochester, N.Y.

29. Rochester, N.Y.

  • Affordability rank: 70
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 24
Cleveland Polish boy sandwiches

Cleveland Polish boy sandwiches

30. Cleveland

  • Affordability rank: 45
  • Quality, diversity, and accessibility rank: 34

Pictured are Cleveland Polish boy sandwiches, a sausage sandwich native to Cleveland, with kielbasa and french fries, and usually covered with barbecue sauce and cole slaw.

Ranking at the bottom overall of 182 cities were Pearl City, Hawaii, Juneau, and Jackson, Miss., with high costs for groceries in Juneau and Pearl City, as well as a paucity of restaurants, coffee shops and gourmet food shops in Pearl City. Jackson has the lowest ratio of full-service restaurants to fast-food establishments. 

Visit WalletHub to see the full ranking of all 182 cities and the methodology for this study.