NEW YORK (MainStreet) — The way you look at a product isn’t just determined by the quality of the thing itself, but by the method you use to pay for it, whether you realize it or not.

When customers intend to pay with a credit card, they are more likely to focus on a product’s benefits, whereas those who pay with cash are more likely to focus on its cost, according to a new study published in the Journal of Consumer Research.

Researchers at the University of Kansas and the University of South Carolina conducted four different experiments with students and found that those using credit cards are more likely to respond to the perks of a particular product and remember the key words related to those benefits afterwards, compared to those paying by cash who hone in on the price tag more.

“Credit-primed consumers are more likely to choose an option that offers superior benefits than those primed with cash, but cash-primed consumers are more likely to choose an option that dominates on costs, even when that option offers inferior benefits,” the researchers concluded.

This may simply be due to the fact that those using credit cards can delay the “pain of payment” longer than people who pay with cash, and therefore indulge more in satisfying their shopping desires and picking out the best-sounding product, even if it costs a little more.

(Hat tip to The Huffington Post)