There wasn't the profit-taking we predicted this Friday in advance of Oscar pool betting. Either people find the markets more compelling than the

American Beauty/Cider House Rules

cliffhanger or nobody feels lucky. Or perhaps those traders holding stocks over the weekend are swingtrading, a strategy discussed during this Saturday's Personal Finance Focus. Self-employed workers can't afford to miss Tracy Byrnes' Tax Forum, which walks through Schedule C -- the form they all must file. And on the lighter side, Easy Money mulls the creative spelling that dot-coms employ when naming themselves. Got any questions? Remember to visit our new Idiot Box Index, where we list previously answered queries about taxes, trading and the markets.

Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy

What goes up will mostly likely keep going up,

Alan Greenspan

be damned. In accordance with expectations, Tuesday the

Federal Reserve

nudged up the federal funds rate -- the interest rate at which banks lend to each other overnight -- to 6% from 5.75%, or 25 basis points. And in contradiction to expectations, the markets surged. The

S&P

sprung 37.19, or 2.6%, to 1493.82 -- a record level -- supported by tech bellwethers, financials, drugmakers and airlines.

Thursday followed with the

Dow Jones Industrial Average

summiting 11,000 for the first time since Feb. 3 by climbing 253.16 to 11,119.86, short-roped by strong earnings indications. The

Nasdaq

also hopped up 75.94, or 1.6%, to 4940.69. Friday the Dow closed at 11,112.72, down 7.14, or 0.06%. The Nasdaq finished up 22.42, or 0.45%, at 4963.03.

The

Federal Open Markets Committee

said that it sees the

threat of inflation as more pressing than the specter of slowing economic growth. That is, nothing's changed since it last met in February. Some believe that the Fed's rate hikes could be drawing to a close and that sentiment encouraged the market. Others were left scratching their heads and attributed it to the money sloshing around in the market. Some even considered the unthinkable: Could it be that Greenspan has lost his footing as powerful Zeus of the market, with his mighty thunderbolt and briefcase?

Kayte VanScoy, special to the TheStreet.com, contributed to this article.

As originally published, this story contained an error. Please see

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