Top 10 Most-Searched Stocks: General Motors

Wal-Mart, which posted earnings that beat estimates despite a charge to settle a lawsuit, also makes the list.
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Stocks in New York posted big losses Tuesday as more dour economic data and corporate news dragged down the market. Shares of

General Motors

(GM) - Get Report

fell especially hard as the company readies its plans to pay back the government the billions it borrowed, sending the company as well as fellow automaker

Ford

(F) - Get Report

, onto TheStreet.com's Top Ten Most Searched Stocks List.

General Motors and

Chrysler

are scheduled to submit turnaround plans to the government Tuesday showing how they can repay billions of dollars in loans and return to profitability. GM has already received $9.4 billion from the government, and would receive another $4 billion if the Treasury Department signs off on its viability plan. Chrysler has borrowed $4 billion. It is seeking another $3 billion.

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Next,

Bank of America

(BAC) - Get Report

and

Citigroup

(C) - Get Report

are back on the list as investors wonder how they will survive a "stress test" under Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner's new "Financial Stability Plan".

Wal-Mart

(WMT) - Get Report

was heavily searched after the company reported a fourth quarter drop in profit of 7.6% as it suffered from a strong dollar. The company still managed to beat analyst expectations, however, after discounting a settlement charge.

Sirius XM

(SIRI) - Get Report

made the list with a bullet. In a last-minute deal, Liberty Media swooped in to save Sirius XM with a $530 million loan infusion, giving it a 40% stake in the satellite-radio shop. Sirius agreed to pay a 15% interest rate on the Liberty Media loans as it sought to fend off a takeover bid from Dish Network operator Charles Ergen.

And

Caterpillar

(CAT) - Get Report

surged onto the list after Stephanie Link, Director of Research for Cramer's Action Alerts PLUS Portfolio, said she's buying shares of the company even as the market slides.

And while gold was up, closing in on $1000 a ounce, gold-miner

Freeport-McMoran

(FCX) - Get Report

was down, even though Cramer said it was his favorite mineral play for a China rebound on Mad Money.

Finally a downgrade on Wall Street for

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

sent shares of all tech companies spiraling downward, even shares of

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

. Both tech bellwethers got rung, but they made the list.

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Before joining TheStreet.com, Gregg Greenberg was a writer and segment producer for CNBC's Closing Bell. He previously worked at FleetBoston and Lehman Brothers in their Private Client Services divisions, covering high net-worth individuals and midsize hedge funds. Greenberg attended New York University's School of Business and Economic Reporting. He also has an M.B.A. from Cornell University's Johnson School of Business, and a B.A. in history from Amherst College.