One out of three ain't bad for Gene Marcial this week. His Inside Wall Street column in Business Week pushes Schwab (SCH) , which I think is a great way to play the continued bull market. It won't pop much on this column; it's now a big-cap, but I would stay with it if I owned it.

I am not certain about another of his picks,

Ibis Technology

(IBIS)

. This stock has been nothing but up and is so extended technically that I have to believe you will lose money if you buy it today. I wouldn't touch this one and would wait for it to come down, which it probably will, a few days from now. It is just up too much.

His final stock pick is a windfall for holders,

United Retail Group

(URGI)

. This stock is a real dog, and I would use any bump this column generates this morning to get out of this stock so fast that you should never look back. Even Marcial's hook, some dubious dot-com being formed by this company, doesn't make sense to me. Here's your chance, beleaguered United Retail Group shareholders; don't screw it up. Blow out right into Geno!

I was red-hot

last week in my analysis of Gene's work. The call to blow out

Cornerstone Internet

(CNRS)

was a home run. What a stinker! His prediction that

International Paper

(IP) - Get Report

could bid higher for

Champion

(CHA) - Get Report

actually panned out for a great trade. Of course, International Paper didn't buy Champion. But it knocked down International Paper to where you could buy it at a good level. I suggested to sell

Snap-On

(SNA) - Get Report

into Marcial's tout. Wow, great one. Three for three.

Speaking of

Business Week

, they talk about the talking heads on Wall Street, drawing no real conclusions other than that

CNBC

is all-powerful, which we know. Shockingly, I am quoted correctly in the article. Kudos to Marcia Vickers, the reporter! Then again, all she did was copy down what I said on the site. She's better at that than the interviewing/quotation game, as she was the reporter who had me accused of shorting

WavePhore

and bashing it on

CNBC

-- something that was just plain

wrong.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long International Paper. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.