The latest data from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation show Bank of America (BAC) - Get Report and Wells Fargo (WFC) - Get Report continue to increase their total assets, while Citigroup (C) - Get Report and JP Morgan (JPM) - Get Report decrease their total assets. The net is a decline in total assets among the four "too big to fail" money center banks both sequntially and year over year.

The FDIC released its Quarterly Banking profile for the fourth quarter of 2015 to little fanfare on Wall Street, which is surprising when you consider this is the best way to analyze the stress in the banking system. Investors need to know this information before bottom fishing for bank stocks, including the "too big to fail" money center giants.

TheStreet's Jim Cramer and research director Jack Mohr, who manage the charitable trust Action Alerts PLUS, which holds Bank of America and Wells Fargo, said investors are not giving Bank of America credit for a much-improved balance sheet, stronger capital ratios and the potential for significant capital returns. They say Bank of America is "extremely compelling for long-term investors" but risky for investors with very short time frames.

As for Wells Fargo, the bank benefits from a "talented management team, diversified business mix and a retail deposit base that helps drive the highest net interest margin among its U.S. large-cap peers," they said. Its dividend yield of over 3.1% "is not only stable but attractive to any investors looking for safe income."

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Here's a table of data from the FDIC showing how total assets are increasing in the banking system but are slowly but surely declining as JPMorgan and Citibank reduce assets while Bank of America and Wells Fargo continue to build assets.

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JPMorgan remains the largest money center bank with more than $2 trillion at the end of 2015, down 1.7% sequentially and down 6.7% for all of 2015. This bank controls 12.9% of the total assets in the banking system down from 14.2% year over year.

Bank of America remains in second place with $1.66 trillion in total assets at the end of 2015, up 1.3% sequentially and up 3.8% for all of 2015. This bank controls 10.4% of the total assets in the banking system up slightly from the end of 2014.

Wells Fargo remains in third place with $1.64 trillion in total assets at the end of 2015, up 2.1% sequentially and up 5% for all of 2005. This bank controls 10.2% of the total assets in the banking system up 0.2% from the end of 2014.

Citigroup continues to reduce total assets, which totaled $1.3 trillion at the end of 2015, down 2.9% sequentially and down 4.3% for all of 2015. This bank controls 8.1% of the total assets in the banking system down 0.6% from the end of 2014.

The overall banking system continues to add total assets, which ended 2015 at $15.97 trillion up 1.1% sequentially and up 2.7% year over year. The percentage controlled by the nation's biggest banks fell to 41.7% down from 42.3% from the third quarter and down from 43.3% from the end of 2014.

Here's a scorecard for the four "too big to fail" banks, their weekly chart and key technical levels.

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Here's the weekly chart for Bank of America.


Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

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Bank of America closed at $12.16 on Tuesday, down 30% since my Dec. 2 analysis of the third- quarter FDIC QBP. The stock is down 27.7% year to date and in bear market territory 34.2% below its multiyear high of $18.48 set on July 22. The stock is up 10.6% from its 2016 low of $10.99 set on Feb. 11.

The weekly chart is negative but oversold with the stock below its key weekly moving average of $13.53 and below its 200-week simple moving average of $14.18. The weekly momentum reading is projected to decline to 16.76 this week down from 17.22 on Feb. 19, both readings are below the oversold threshold of 20.00.

Investors looking to buy the stock should place a good till canceled limit order to buy the stock if it drops to $10.14, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of this week. Investors looking to reduce holdings should place a GTC limit order to sell the stock if it rises to $17.58, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of March.

Here's the daily chart for Citigroup.


Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

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Citigroup closed at $38.22 Tuesday, down 29% since my Dec. 2 analysis of the third-quarter FDIC QBP. The stock is down 26.1% year to date and in bear market territory 37.3% below its multiyear high of $60.96 set on July 23. The stock is up 10.7% from its 2016 low of $34.52 set on Feb. 11.

The weekly chart is negative but oversold with the stock below its key weekly moving average of $41.95 and below its 200-week simple moving average of $46.88. The weekly momentum reading is projected to rise to 16.39 this week up from 15.56 on Feb. 19, both readings are below the oversold threshold of 20.00.

Investors looking to buy the stock should place a good till canceled limit order to buy the stock if it drops to $31.59, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of this week. Investors looking to reduce holdings should place a GTC limit order to sell the stock if it rises to $48.36 and $50.22, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of February and March, respectively.

Here's the daily chart for JPMorgan Chase.


Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

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JPMorgan had a close of $56.12 on Tuesday, down 15.8% since my Dec. 2 analysis of the third-quarter FDIC QBP. The stock is down 15% year to date and in bear market territory 20.5% below its all-time high of $70.61 set on July 23. The stock is up 6.9% from its 2016 low of $52.50 set on Feb. 11.

The weekly chart is neutral with the stock below its key weekly moving average of $58.84 but above its 200-week simple moving average of $54.58, last tested during the week of Feb. 12. The weekly momentum reading is projected to rise to 29.40 this week up slightly from 29.12 on Feb. 19.

Investors looking to buy the stock should place a good till canceled limit order to buy the stock if it drops to $51.03, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of this week. Investors looking to reduce holdings should place a GTC limit order to sell the stock if it rises to $62.51 and $66.52, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of February and March, respectively. A key level of $55.45 will act as a magnet for the remainder of 2016.

Here's the daily chart for Wells Fargo.


Courtesy of MetaStock Xenith

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Wells Fargo closed at $48.10 on Tuesday, down 12.7% since my Dec. 2 analysis of the third-quarter FDIC QBP. The stock is down 11.5% year to date and in correction territory 17.2% below its all-time high of $58.07 set on July 23. The stock is up 8.1% from its 2016 low of $44.50 set on Feb. 11.

The weekly chart is neutral with the stock below its key weekly moving average of $49.37 but above its 200-week simple moving average of $45.88, last tested during the week of Feb. 12. The weekly momentum reading is projected to rise to 26.84 this week up slightly from 26.06 on Feb. 19.

Investors looking to buy the stock should place a good till canceled limit order to buy the stock if it drops to $43.70, which is a key level on technical charts until the end of this week. Investors looking to reduce holdings should place a GTC limit order to sell the stock if it rises to $51.34 and $61.20, which are key levels on technical charts until the end of February and March, respectively. A key level of $49.40 will act as a magnet for the remainder of 2016.

This article is commentary by an independent contributor. At the time of publication, the author held no positions in the stocks mentioned.