Steve Jobs May Be Right About Flash But ...:Today's Outrage

Steve Jobs will win the Flash war with Adobe, but in the meantime he's turning the Web into Swiss Cheese with all the holes in the Apple browser.
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CUPERTINO, California (

TheStreet

) --

Steve Jobs' "thoughts on flash"

(published on

Apple's

(AAPL) - Get Report

Web site last week) makes plenty of sense.

I think Jobs is right to support "open" standards for the Web. I also agree about the need for high-performance, low-power mobile devices with touch controls.

It's hard to argue with any of that. Yet Steve Jobs' noble idealism is severely limiting the Web experience on the iPad, iPhone and iPod. Let's face it,

Adobe's

(ADBE) - Get Report

Flash products are all over the Web.

Apple's ban on Flash is creating Swiss cheese out of the Internet -- there are holes everywhere you look on the Apple browsers installed on the iPad, iPhone and iPod.

I hope everyone will quickly come to accept Steve Jobs' dominion over the mobile Web so that we can all truly enjoy our Apple experience. With a million iPads sold in just a month on the market, it's clear that the mobile Web user is siding with Jobs.

Not even

Google

(GOOG) - Get Report

has this kind of power. Google may shape the way we gather and store information, but Apple is controlling the presentation -- and that's the way to win the hearts and souls of consumers.

Need proof that Apple is more powerful than Google? How about the fact that Google has an iPad app!

Resistance is futile. Jobs will win this war with Adobe because he's offering such an incredible user experience that everyone will rebuild their Web sites and create new apps to meet Apple's standards.

Adobe will have to take Jobs' advice and shift to "open" standards such as HTML5 or its presence on the Web may be just a "Flash" in the pan.

The way it looks today, it's Steve Jobs way or you're off the Internet highway.

--Written by Glenn Hall in New York.

You can also follow my outrage on

Twitter

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