Editor's note: This is a special sneak preview of Jim Cramer's just-released book,

Jim Cramer's Stay Mad for Life: Get Rich, Stay Rich (Make Your Kids Even Richer)

. Look for more sneak previews every day, and get your free copy with your annual subscription to Action Alerts PLUS; click here for details. Catch Cramer in person to get it signed Saturday, Jan. 12, at 1 p.m. in Westbury, Long Island's Costco. Missed the first sneak previews? Read the book intro and the rules of getting and staying rich: Rule 1, Rule 2, Rule 3, Rule 4 and Rule 5. Know what pros do right and amateurs do wrong: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5. Learn the five mini-bull markets that will stampede for years, starting with aerospace and defense, agriculture, oil and oil service, minerals and mining and infrastructure.

Watchers of "Mad Money" know that I end my show every night with the mantra "There's always a bull market somewhere and I promise to find it just for you." Most people think of the stock market as one big market, a monolith. Nothing could be further from the truth.

TST Recommends

The market is made up of numerous submarkets and sectors, some good, some bad. At all times, something's working, something's making you money. The trick is to find out what that something is and stick with it, exploit it, and build a diversified portfolio around it.

On "Mad Money," we have spent a great deal of time trying to find those bull markets. I want to reveal now, for the first time, the ones I think will last -- maybe not for life, but certainly for the next five years. These are sectors that have some tremendous secular growth trends behind them, meaning that regardless of what's happening in the domestic economy, regardless of all of that chatter you hear endlessly about what the

Federal Reserve

might do or what the growth of the nation is or what the next quarters look like, these bull markets will hold up on their own.

They are all different sectors, so you can pick a stock in a sector and be sure that you have my blessing for the stock, because 50% of a stock's performance is its sector. To put it another way, you want to buy a house in a good neighborhood, because even the worst house in a good neighborhood is better than the best house in a declining neighborhood.

Inside Cramer's New Book:'Stay Mad for Life'

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So what are those fabulous neighborhoods? What areas do I think will be great, not just for this year, but for many years to come? I have five of them, and I will tell you why you can buy stocks in these sectors regardless of the chatter and how they will stay strong for many years to come.

I always say that I am a tease on TV, that I make you wait the whole show, including the Lightning Round, before you find out what I really like. But I don't want my

Stay Mad

readers to be mad at me. So here we go: (1) aerospace and defense, (2) agriculture, (3) oil and oil service, (4) minerals and mining, and (5) infrastructure.

Before we take them one by one, I want to let you in on the secret behind why these bull markets can be bought regardless of the U.S. economy and the Federal Reserve's attitude at a given moment: these are ROWers. That's right, they are Rest of World stocks, meaning they don't depend on the U.S. economy to propel them higher.

We no longer want to be hostage to the U.S. economy, because our nation has entered a slow-growth phase that I believe will last for many, many years, certainly the period that you can count on this book to help you in. Believe me, I wish it weren't the case. But I have to be realistic; we are not in a position in this great country to grow at the pace of other countries, particularly less-developed countries, or countries in the Middle East that are linked to oil, or countries with high-growth populations that need to put money and people to work in order to keep civil order, such as China, India and most of Latin America.

The ROW category is what all of these bulls have in common. Given the growth paths outside the United States, I am highly confident that American companies in these bull markets can compete with and beat foreign companies on their home turf.

Now that you know the secrets behind why these mini-bulls keep stampeding, let's explore why each market has "legs," as we say in the business.

Aerospace and Defense

When we think of the airlines, we think of companies that seem to go in and out of business, companies that have labor problems, companies that fight each other for routes and gates and can't seem to make any money unless the planes are full to the gills and jet fuel is low in price. That's why American investors have such a hard time understanding the bull market in aerospace. They are too U.S.-centric.

Around the globe in every newly industrialized nation, there is a booming airline company, often state-run, that is growing the way our airlines grew in the 1940s and 1950s, when this sector was hot, hot, hot. This growth can go on for years.

As is so often the case, the epicenter of this bull market is China, where many of the major cities, cities that in the U.S. would have two or three airlines serving them, don't even have airline service. China could use 10 times the number of planes it has and still not offer airline service to cities of millions of people. That means there will be demand for planes just for China that could fill order books for generations.

The countries in the Middle East, flush with oil money, want to expand their airlines. So do the newly wealthy nations in South America. Same with Central and Eastern Europe. That's where the growth is coming from.

When I list 20 stocks for the future, you will read my case for

Boeing

(BA) - Get Report

, but there are only two major aircraft companies capable of meeting these worldwide needs: Airbus and Boeing. Right now only one of them, Boeing, can produce the planes.

As with all bull markets, the components of the bulls, the suppliers to the end markets -- in this case, Boeing and Airbus -- can boom right alongside the customers. That means a company like

BE Aerospace

(BEAV)

, which makes seating; and

Honeywell

(HON) - Get Report

, which makes precision instruments; and

Spirit

(SPR) - Get Report

, which makes wing assembly; and

Precision Castparts

(PCP)

and

Allegheny Technologies

(ATO) - Get Report

, experts in the "skin" of planes; can all boom right along with their clients.

On Wall Street, we often group aerospace with defense. That's because the analysts who understand planes can follow the defense plays that have an aerospace component.

In this particular case, there's more than just convenience to the marriage. The U.S. is home to most of the world's major defense contractors, and we have become a giant exporter of the tools of war. We are arms merchants, financing billions and billions of dollars to arm Saudi Arabia and Israel and Egypt for many years to come. Plus, in our own country post-9/11, both political parties have remained committed to military spending, something that will continue even if we eventually wind up our efforts in Iraq.

That means

Raytheon

(RTN) - Get Report

,

Lockheed Martin

(LMT) - Get Report

,

General Dynamics

(GD) - Get Report

,

Northrop Grumman

(NOC) - Get Report

and

L-3

(LLL) - Get Report

, the major defense contractors, have what is known as "visibility," meaning they can see orders many years out.

Oh, and don't forget that Boeing is one of the top five defense contractors too. Boeing could stay in bull-market mode just from defense for years to come.

There are lots of smaller defense plays, such as

Alliant Techsystems

(ATK)

, the nation's largest bullet maker, that will make sense as long as the Iraq War continues, but I prefer to go with the larger defense contractors that have far more overseas business than the smaller ones, which are almost entirely dependent on the U.S. military.

Editor's note: This is a special sneak preview of Jim Cramer's just-released book,

Jim Cramer's Stay Mad for Life: Get Rich, Stay Rich (Make Your Kids Even Richer)

. Look for more sneak previews every day, and get your free copy with your annual subscription to Action Alerts PLUS; click here for details. Catch Cramer in person to get it signed Saturday, Jan. 12, at 1 p.m. in Westbury, Long Island's Costco. Missed the first sneak previews? Read the book intro and the rules of getting and staying rich: Rule 1, Rule 2, Rule 3, Rule 4 and Rule 5. Know what pros do right and amateurs do wrong: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4 and Part 5.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long Raytheon.

From Jim Cramer's Stay Mad for Life by James J. Cramer and Cliff Mason. Copyright

2007 by Jim Cramer. Reprinted by permission of Simon & Schuster, Inc.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for

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