Each week, listeners to

"RealMoney" radio show have the opportunity to vote to have Cramer discuss a single stock. This week, audiences voted for credit card processor

MasterCard

(MA) - Get Report

, which recently had an initial public offering.

Cramer said the stock, which went public at $39, should have been priced around $45, but the problems caused by the

Vonage

(VG) - Get Report

IPO debacle alarmed the underwriters enough to price the MasterCard offering lower.

If the stock had opened at $45, it would have been trading at a multiple of 15 times conservatively estimated future earnings of $3 a share, Cramer said.

"I would be willing to pay $90, if it continues growing," he said.

There are 24 million merchants across the globe that accept the brand, and huge insider buying by top executives are huge positives for Cramer. He dismissed a potential legal battle with banks over the company's name as unlikely to go anywhere.

The next stock on parade was newspaper company

Tribune

(TRB)

.

"Don't get suckered in by Tribune," he said. "These newspaper stocks are value traps."

He explained that the company was aiming to grow its employment Web site from 6% of its current business to 15%. But that didn't impress Cramer. "Monster is a better competitor, and don't forget Craiglist," he said, and drawing attention to the availability of free job listings on the latter.

Cramer then turned to "Vonage, the Dog," his latest pet hate.

Currently, voice-over Internet telecom companies, such as Vonage, benefit from not paying/charging FCC fees such as those levied on regular phone systems. But, observes Cramer, that may all be about to change.

"I bet the Vonage folks were aware of the FCC change," he said. "These guys just made a major exploitation of the system."

"I hope I got you out of Vonage. It's not too late."

To see the most recent edition of The RealMoney Radio Recap in its entirety, please click here. This recap is published every day around 3 p.m. ET.

Jim Cramer is a director and co-founder of TheStreet.com. He contributes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's sites and serves as an adviser to the company's CEO. Outside contributing columnists for TheStreet.com and RealMoney.com, including Cramer, may, from time to time, write about stocks in which they have a position. In such cases, appropriate disclosure is made. To see his personal portfolio and find out what trades Cramer will make before he makes them, sign up for

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