When

Matt "B2B" Jacobs

and I decided we had to learn the B2B world, everyone told us that we were too late, the move had occurred.

That was wrong. And our method of learning, a

B2B rotisserie league, left us with hefty gains on paper and in real life.

Remember, the genesis for this project came from our own experiences with rotisserie leagues: They force you to get involved. I learned that from

John Walsh

, when he was editor of

Inside Sports Magazine

.

Walsh drafted me into one of the leagues that he had created because he wanted everybody at

Inside Sports

to be savvy about players. (I was writing at

American Lawyer

at the time but I loved sports and was anxious to be involved.)

So, with that in mind I asked

Melissa "Genome" Kasper

, another research analyst at my firm, to put together a list of draft candidates for a biotech rotisserie league, an area that I admit to being in need of a brush-up.

The idea is the same at the B2B draft: We will read all of your comments about each one of these names in our boards and we will draft with a mythical $1 million each next Monday. So you have five days to weigh in.

Like last time, we expect to rely heavily on your comments, which were incredibly helpful when we drafted the B2Bers.

So, without further adieu, here are the 20:

Once these entries are posted on the

ticker-board section of our message boards, I am going to ask Genome Kasper to put her squibs of description under each entry.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long Imclone Systems and Human Genome Sciences. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.