One Last Look

Cramer sums up the day, then bids everyone adieu.
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Bring back those good old bad advance-decline days. You know, the ones where the Dow was down and the Nasdaq was up? Remember how much money was made when those thousands of stocks were going down and only a handful were rallying?

What a nasty day, except for the doormats, some of which seemed to go from 52-week lows to 52-week highs in the same week. The only guys who rallied big today where those who are committed to polluting rivers and destroying the environment! Hoo-hah.

Today looked like someone took those Twenty Janus Stocks -- you know, TSEL (The Stocks Everybody Loves) -- and beat the *^$*&%$^?$^ out of them. Maybe it was NOT ironic that Janus closed its fund today to new investors. It's almost like the market said that without the Janus Twenty getting in new money to continue to take Janus' 20 favorite stocks up, these stocks are headed down. How is that for a conspiracy theory?

Well, gang, this is it for me. I am not taking my personal computer on vacation. First time since I bought one. My wife and kids deserve better than my frenetically running to check what options

Dan Colarusso

says people are buying or how

Aaron Task

wraps up the market. They will get it.

Only a rewrite remains between me and the biggest sand castle-tunnel-moat this side of the Atlantic. If I don't answer your email, don't lose faith. You won't be able to restrain me when I get back.

Random musings:

I hope the good folks at

Lucent

(LU)

learned this week that it isn't worth it to preannounce during a cyclical rotation out of whiners and into losers. Oops, I meant, winners.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund had no positions in the stocks mentioned, although holdings can change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

letters@thestreet.com.