How do you squelch the most enthusiasm for the market? You repeal the gains of

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

,

Oracle

(ORCL) - Get Report

,

Applied Materials

(AMAT) - Get Report

,

Sun Micro

(SUNW) - Get Report

and

Cisco

(CSCO) - Get Report

.

What could be more debilitating? What could sap more hope?

It's getting obvious that these stocks have to torture the heck out of everybody -- bulls and bears -- before we get a bottom. Bears can say that they have made money in these since the market's peak, but the simple truth is that they have been frustrating and crummy to everybody intrasession and intraweek.

There's always a day when they spike up and start looking like their old selves, and then there's a follow-up day when they remind you that you aren't in a bull market anymore.

These stocks are becoming a distraction internally. We would rather trade energy stocks or food stocks than undergo the torture of these five

Nazzdogs

.

We, like many others, know that these stocks have a sixth sense. They won't rally until we sell them. But if we sell them, they will rally. So we do nothing. And we slowly find ourselves getting eaten alive by our favorites.

Somehow I wish we could alert these stocks that we have sold, so they know to go up!! (LOL.)

But this is no fantasy stock game. In this game the stocks are for real.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long Intel, Oracle, Sun Microsystems, American Materials and Cisco. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.