More Conference Coverage, Twinlab And Psion

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TheStreet.com

publishes selected email received by the publication and its staff members. Send email intended for publication in this section to: letters@thestreet.com. Please include your full name. Letters may be edited for length, clarity, accuracy and style.

Cheers for the Chambermaid

Medora Lee:

I am enjoying

your reports from the

Goldman Sachs Conference

. The stock market is becoming a national pastime. Anyone with a computer can now speculate, you can get a good stock tip from chambermaids in New York City, parking attendants in Miami, and cab drivers in San Francisco. I don't know whether to get worried or not. Las Vegas keeps growing, why not the stock market? Traditional methods of investing, and evaluating companies are on vacation until further notice.

--

Rich Knopf

(Received 2/11)

I usually enjoy Medora Lee's column. But, the next time you want to illustrate the dangers of the market, use a financial advice columnist who blew a lot of money on options. Goodness knows that's so much more common than the chambermaid stuff.

Good for the chambermaid! She learned something, and next time she'll stick to cash, do more research, and make money. At least I hope so. Tell her to look up trading principles on

TheStreet.com

It's a friendly site.

--

Antoinette Burkett

(Received 2/11)

Twinlab's Muscle

Christopher Byron

: I enjoyed

the article. I noticed a lot of companies in the

Twinlab

(TWLB)

industry have tanked although earnings and growth seem strong. I've got a small position with some, and hope Twinlab leads them out of the cellar.

--

David Needles

(Received 2/10)

Your article on Twinlab irritated me. I spend hours reading and researching material. Your wordy introduction and lead to the Twinlab story wasted my time. I was upset that I spent so much time reading about crap, just to get to the meat of the problem with Twinlab. For me it was particularly annoying because I hold stock in the company and I am unhappy about the losses that I have incurred.

--

Tom West

(Received 2/11)

Sharp Diamonds

Nick Watson:

Good piece. It gives me further confidence in advancing my position in

Motorola

(MOT)

. The reason I'm writing is that I can't help but wonder how many of your readers will make the

Pink Floyd

connection and how many will not. It sure gave me a pleasant chuckle at the end of a hard day.

--

Michael Myers

(Received 2/10)

While I have absolutely no interest in

Psion

as a company or a stock, I very much enjoyed the headline over your piece in Wednesday's

The Street.com

. "Psion you Crazy Diamond" brought a smile to my face as it would to any true Pink Floyd fan. It brings to mind many possibilities. Welcome my Sun (Microsystems), welcome to the (International Business) Machine etc.

--

Mike Riley

(Received 2/10)

Change Is In The Air

Jim Cramer:

Even with the focus of

Motorola

(MOT)

and

Cisco

(CSCO) - Get Report

,

really functional wireless is technically still a ways off.

Receiving the signal isn't a problem; it is the transmission from the laptop back to the server that takes a lot of power.

Much more likely in the year time frame is immediate cable/phone access. Walk into a room, and connect to a sub-net (and AC power!). You can do that today in many large companies, but it is still at the wire stage. Yet that is proving sufficient for now.

Walking into your favorite Cafe and doing the same with your laptop, that will be the next step. When is

Starbuck's

going to get wired? They have the power plugs on airline seats. Why not at each table?

Finally, Internet connections using just AC electrical lines are a so much more tasty possibility. Power and connectivity together.

"A car in every garage, Two chickens in every pot, and one PC server in every home office!"

--

Richard Vireday

(Received 2/9)

Goldman Coverage Gets Sacked

Your

coverage on the Goldman conference seems skewed to net stocks. Yes you did cover

Dell

(DELL) - Get Report

(keynote speech) and

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

. So net stocks and PCs. What about other companies? I was particularly interested in

EMC

(EMC)

and

Veritas

(VRTS) - Get Report

. I can conclude one of three things:

  • You don't have enough reporters to cover everything.
  • Nothing else said during the day was "newsworthy".
  • You don't care about anything other than what you reported on.

So which one is it? Is there a fourth conclusion I didn't think of?

Ron Searls, EMC

(Received 2/9)

Reacting to Ralph

JJC

wrote: "Send them a nasty email ...

Biggs

or

Grant

or

Acampora

... are going to be on the Wrong end of my skewer."

Why? They are perfect foils. Buy after their views hit. We should be thanking these guys for giving us the opportunity to buy after their bad calls bring prices down, so we can buy

Intel

(INTC) - Get Report

at 122 7/8, last Fri, or

Cisco

(CSCO) - Get Report

at 98 7/8 today. I think these are great buys, available thanks only to the doomsayers.

--

Charles E. Finberg

(Received 2/8)

Whenever Ralph makes one of his big market predictions, it always seems to come after the market has already made a somewhat significant move in the direction he calls. The market rockets at the start of the year, he's on

CNNfn

saying investors should be 100% in stocks. The Nasdaq retreats 100+ in a few days, he then calls for a correction. He could never cut back against the pursuit like

Terrel Davis

.

--

Tom Geary

(Received 2/8)

Paper vs. PC

James Cramer

: I am no blind supporter of the

publishing companies, but I am not blind to their advantages. The Net is a wonderful tool and it has changed the way I do many things. But, it has not changed my desire, or that of many other people I know, to read newspapers and magazines where and when we want them. Right now Net access is still slow and sometimes unreliable. I also hate reading everything on a screen. Before you call me a heretic, I am not alone in these complaints.

Yes, I know that I can get

Business Week Online

, but I still prefer the print version. I know that I can get the

NY Times

or the

Wall Street Journal

Online, but I choose to read the print version on the train to work. Timeliness of information is an issue, but I supplement that with the Web or

ESPN

to get late night sports scores.

Someday, I may change and read the papers on my PC with a wireless connection on the way to work, and hope that I do not lose my connection in the tunnels around 30th street station. But I am comfortable that the

Times

and

Journal

will have something to offer me, and will likely charge me for this service like

The Street.com.

I really enjoy your site and am a paid subscriber for almost 2 years. I am sick of your tirades against the publishing industry and your belief that they do not respect you. If you are doing your job well, and I think the site does, you will reap your rewards.

--

Jim Wright

(Received 2/8)

I had the opportunity to work with some publishing folks a few years back. This was in a division of one of the big publishing houses. I found it astounding that even though the job of this division was to be immersed in technology and write about it, they knew or cared very little for the technology. They essentially farmed out the writing and then assembled the manuscripts on their network. Reading the books they published you would think they were on the leading edge, when in reality they were in some very remote backwater. It doesn't surprise me that the publishing world just doesn't get it yet.

When

Motorola

(MOT)

and

Cisco

(CSCO) - Get Report

can give me anywhere access at T1 or better bandwidth I'll be happy.

--

Craig Betteridge

(Received 2/8)

Give A Man A Fish ...

Gary B.Smith

: I really identify with your line of thought about learning to fish and the parallel you made to the golfing world.

I myself know a restless scalper who is in and out in less than an hour, and another person who buys and holds for years, and still another who's time frame is somewhere in-between. It seems that just about all trading styles work at some time or another. And one person's style is clearly not perfect for another.

If you fail a few times while searching for your own style? So what? In the end, you come out ahead by discovering the way YOU can do it.

I think you've done us a great service to remind us of this.

--

John Mayer

(Recieved 2/7)