This column by Jim Cramer appeared earlier Friday on RealMoney. To receive a free trial, click here.

While Washington burns, the corporate world isn't fiddling -- it's taking action, with companies taking advantage of depressed pricing, unusual valuations and unique properties to do some buying.

This morning's ridiculously lowball bid for

Clorox

(CLX) - Get Report

by Carl Icahn is an example of what's about to happen in this country. I have little doubt that now that Clorox is in play, a company like

Unilever

(UN) - Get Report

will easily spend $12 billion of $13 billion to snap it up. You could see this one go to $100 a share once it is in play, wildly overvalued on depressed earnings but incredibly cheap as an asset play with great brands. The stock's been lower than it should be because management overpaid for

Burt's Bees

and has undermanaged its core brands. It lacks scale. But it will be perfect for a Unilever counter to

Procter

(PG) - Get Report

, which once owned the company but had it divested by an aggressive FTC in the 1960s.

Or

Petrohawk

(HK)

. Here's a company I have been pounding the table on because of its amazing Eagle Ford assets, worth far more than the company's selling for ... at least until today when

BHP Billiton

(BHP) - Get Report

bought it. You could have made a ton of money -- trading at $38.75, wow!! -- simply because this stock, too, has been depressed, notably by a series of powerful articles in

The New York Times

basically saying that the industry's a fraud and there's not much there there. Given that BHP has already had tremendous success with its Fayetteville assets for $4.75 billion back in February -- an area, by the way, that the

Times

highlights as being especially overvalued if not downright uneconomic -- this is a sign that a smart acquirer knows these assets are long-lived and solid.

Given the high concentration of oil and gas in Eagle Ford, something that Chip Johnson, the CEO of

Carrizo

(CRZO) - Get Report

, a big Eagle Ford asset holder, told me on "Mad Money" the other day is as easy as "shooting fish in a barrel," it would not shock me if more foreign companies did more buying before long. If you wanted more assets on the cheap, the cheapest are

EOG Resources

(EOG) - Get Report

and

Pioneer Natural Resources

(PXD) - Get Report

.

There's a remarkable plethora of assets in this country, branded, and natural, worth a great deal more to bigger companies -- particularly foreign companies -- than they are in the stock market. BHP's prospecting in Eagle Ford, Icahn's prelude of a bid for Clorox by a foreigner -- so natural you can smell it like bleach -- are the real pattern here, obscured, as usual, by our obsession with bonds and politics.

Don't lose sight of the power of individual companies' worth. Don't lose sight of how everything trades in lock step now because there is so little money coming in to the market and it is dominated by high-frequency traders who simply whip around the futures and the ETFs as if individual companies don't matter. They mattered to shareholders of Clorox and Petrohawk. They will keep mattering right up and through the deficit deadline as corporate chiefs globally recognize that the absurdities of politics are depressing prices along with the managements (Clorox) and the press (Petrohawk) and that the prizes are available to those willing to see through the manmade obfuscation.

At the time of publication, Cramer had no positions in the stocks mentioned.