Good Omen for Apple? And Bad Omen for Sabratek, Family Golf and Pillowtex?

An abbreviated Herb.
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Tuesday's Trinkets

Mac Attack:

An item

here two months ago mentioned that businesses were starting to reconsider buying

Apple Computer

(AAPL) - Get Report

products.

The info was based on data from Mike Kelly of

Techtel

, an Emeryville, Calif., company that tracks PC buying patterns. The latest data, Kelly says, show businesses are continuing to evaluate Apple but have been holding off purchases. But if additional positive press on Apple's new products allays those fears, he says, new biz purchases should start showing up in a quarter or two.

And regarding Dell: He says

Dell's

(DELL) - Get Report

biz continues to accelerate "by every measure we have," except in low-end servers, where his data show it being beaten by

Compaq

(CPQ)

, a relatively insignificant part of Dell's biz.

Sabratek's sorrows:

This company just goes from bad to worse. Two weeks ago it was

Sabratek's

(SBTKE)

CFO

spilling the beans on internal accounting issues. The latest: Late Friday, after everybody on Wall Street had gone home, the hobbled maker of medical infusion pumps said it would not make its $2.4 million semi-annual interest payment due on its convertible notes. It added: "If the interest payment is not made within a 30-day cure period, then an Event of Default will take place under the Indenture." In which case, the company could be headed for the Big B.

Ditto for

Family Golf Centers

(FGCI)

, which yesterday said it had received its second extension in two weeks from lenders. But it, too, warns this last-ditch effort may not be successful.

And seen

Pillowtex

(PTX) - Get Report

lately? A week ago its lenders amended the loan covenants to allow Pillowtex more flexibility. Still, the important stats: $1.1 bil in debt, and a market value of $77 mil.

Herb Greenberg writes daily for TheStreet.com. In keeping with TSC's editorial policy, he doesn't own or short individual stocks, though he owns stock in TheStreet.com. He also doesn't invest in hedge funds or other private investment partnerships. He welcomes your feedback at

herb@thestreet.com. Greenberg also writes a monthly column for Fortune.

Mark Martinez assisted with the reporting of this column.