It is no break to be waiting in various hospitals in Philadelphia and New York, but I confess to finding no surprises on my screen after these two days.

The

Nasdaq

ramps and listed lists. What else is new?

Sure, divergences should be corrected. Certainly one part of the market is out of whack with the other. But you know what I find surprising? The few Old Economy stocks we have keep getting hammered. As a lark I called in from the hospital to ask what was down the most, thinking it might be one of

Matt "Volatility" Jacobs'

stocks.

Not!

Dial

(DL) - Get Report

! It was Dial. The same stock that, when it was 24, I wrote that I wanted to be short stocks that move in quarter-points and long stocks that move in 2- and 3-point increments. Boy, was that right! Dial has now been cut in half. When the

Aribas

(ARBA)

and the

Sevenexes

TST Recommends

(

724 Solutions

(SVNX)

) continue to ramp.

Oh yeah, and to those of you who sent me email about how I was going to get clubbed in

VeriSign

(VRSN) - Get Report

, I have bad news for you. That's where I thought it would be, too.

Random musings:

Looks like my wife will be setting off a few metal detectors. A plate and seven screws later, and she still isn't up from the recovery room. And the doctor gave me the heads-up to use the pain killers.

Poor

Trading Goddess.

And get this! My dad just got discharged. Laser surgery, just amazing!

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long VeriSign, Ariba and 724 Solutions. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.