Back to business. This whole week's moves were based on a

lack

of fundamentals. Only a backdrop of

no

news coupled with options expirations would allow for such rapid fire increases and decreases.

Today we leave expirations and we regain the world of fundamentals, as the shareholders of

Carnival Cruise

(CCL) - Get Report

and

Interim Services

(IS)

know all too well. But we also find out that the semis are better than expected, courtesy of guidance from

Applied Materials

(AMAT) - Get Report

,

Jabil

(JBL) - Get Report

(Good for

Lucent

(LU)

and

Dell

(DELL) - Get Report

, big users of Jabil?) and

Fairchild Semiconductor

(FCS)

.

And we learned that

Boeing

(BA) - Get Report

, which was on the ropes if this strike lasted much longer, can come roaring back. We took some Boeing on this in early hours because we thought the strike would last forever.

The only change, and it is a big one, is that we are interested in the fundamentals again from the Old Economy. We sat rapt, listening to positive voice mail on the airlines this morning. We would have hit delete as recently as a week ago.

Random musings:

Cross fingers. Leaving at the opening today to hold the right hand of my wife as they take the stitches out of her left wrist and see if the setting -- screws and plate -- is working. I figured, after the 16 pieces I delivered yesterday, you would understand.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long Dell, Fairchild Semiconductor, Applied Materials and Boeing. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.