Blowing a Raspberry at BlackBerry

RIMM's now good for only one thing -- short squeezes ahead of product intros.
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All anyone wants to talk about is Research in Motion (RIMM) . RIMM, RIMM, RIMM! I say RIMM rhymes with Garmin (GRMN) - Get Report. And could ultimately be Garmin, or at least a slightly better, more proprietary Garmin.

I don't care about new RIMM phones. I don't care about RIMM censorship. I don't care about how RIMM owns the enterprise world.

All I care about is who the big carriers are getting behind, and it sure isn't RIMM.

AT&T's

(T) - Get Report

trying to sew up as many

Apple

(AAPL) - Get Report

iPhone users it can, before it loses exclusivity to

Verizon

(VZ) - Get Report

, which I have been saying will happen in Q1. Verizon's putting its dollars behind the Droid, and it is extremely happy with Droid sales. Still, Verizon is going to pursue Apple big time, and you don't woo Apple unless you decide Apple's getting pole position.

That doesn't leave a lot of room for RIMM.

RIMM's stock is acting like

Nokia's

(NOK) - Get Report

and

Motorola's

(MOT)

when they peaked. They would put out new phone iterations, and the stocks would go up and then, bang! They would get hammered when everyone realized they weren't needle movers.

I think RIMM's now good for only one thing -- short squeezes ahead of product intros.

Other than that, just take it off your screen, as I have done with MOT, NOK and GRMN. They are all on my back-up page, getting nary a glance during the important hours of trading.

Random musings:

I am still digging these fertilizer plays and think this worldwide drought will prove supportive for both

Deere

(DE) - Get Report

and

Potash

(POT)

, as the way to benefit if you are a farmer in a fecund land is to buy Deere tractors and POT fertilizer.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long AAPL.

At the time of publication, Cramer was long XXX. Jim Cramer, co-founder and chairman of TheStreet.com, writes daily market commentary for TheStreet.com's RealMoney and runs the charitable trust portfolio,

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. He also participates in video segments on TheStreet.com TV and serves as host of CNBC's "Mad Money" television program.

Mr. Cramer graduated magna cum laude from Harvard College, where he was president of The Harvard Crimson. He worked as a journalist at the Tallahassee Democrat and the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, covering everything from sports to homicide before moving to New York to help start American Lawyer magazine. After a three-year stint, Mr. Cramer entered Harvard Law School and received his J.D. in 1984. Instead of practicing law, however, he joined Goldman Sachs, where he worked in sales and trading. In 1987, he left Goldman to start his own hedge fund. While he worked at his fund, Mr. Cramer helped start Smart Money for Dow Jones and then, in 1996, he co-founded TheStreet.com, of which he is chairman and where he has served as a columnist and contributor since. In 2000, Mr. Cramer retired from active money management to embrace media full time, including radio and television.

Mr. Cramer is the author of "

Confessions of a Street Addict

," "You Got Screwed," "Jim Cramer's Real Money," "Jim Cramer's Mad Money," "Jim Cramer's Stay Mad for Life" and, most recently, "Jim Cramer's Getting Back to Even." He has written for Time magazine and New York magazine and has been featured on CBS' 60 Minutes, NBC's Nightly News with Brian Williams, Meet the Press, Today, The Tonight Show, Late Night and MSNBC's Morning Joe.