An Affair to Remember

Finally, a love affair has been reignited in the small-caps by takeovers and insider buying, and not a moment too soon, Cramer says.
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Between the takeovers and the insider buying, we are seeing a mini-love affair in the small-caps these days. And none too soon, as some of these companies are way too unloved.

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Just this morning, we saw bids for three cellar-dwellers:

Safeskin

(SFSK)

,

Chesapeake

(CSK)

and

North American Vaccine

(NVX)

. These stocks were once full of promise.

Now they were full of capital losers. The last of these, in particular, was one of the most hyped names I have ever seen. But nothing could move it in the past few years.

And if you look at where the insider buying is coming from, you see it in a lot of stocks that were once full of promise and traded much higher:

Arrow Electronics

(ARW) - Get Report

,

AutoZone

(AZO) - Get Report

,

CNA Financial

(CNA) - Get Report

,

Dial

(DL) - Get Report

,

Goodrich

(GR)

,

Playtex

(PYX) - Get Report

,

Tokheim

(TOK) - Get Report

, to name a few.

My take: Lots of companies are getting fed up with their stocks, and they are doing something about it. They are buying. They are selling their whole companies if they can't make it. They are making things happen.

They can't be dot-coms. They can't be B2Bs.

But they know they are worth more than this.

That makes for a lot of ways to win.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long Dial. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.