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NEW YORK (

TheStreet

) -- For all of

American International Group's

(AIG) - Get American International Group, Inc. Report

faults -- and there are many --

TheStreet.com's

readers still think the company will be able to repay its mounds of debt.

Almost two thirds -- 64.5% -- of the more than 2,500 voters in our weeklong poll said that AIG will ultimately be able to repay the $85 billion loan it received from the government last fall. Only 35.5% said AIG would be unable to make the payments.

AIG made some strides this week to repay its debt to society.

The company said it will

repay $2 billion in short-term debt for its International Lease Finance unit

, which was due on Thursday.

The company also sold off its Taiwan unit, Nan Shan Life, for $2.15 billion to

Primus Financial

. This is the biggest sale AIG has made since it began divesting asset after asset last year.

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But the sale, of course, comes with a price.

AIG said it will record a charge of about $1.4 billion

after taxes in the fourth quarter related to the sale of its 98% stake in the company.

The sale of Nan Shan falls under the "held-for-sale" criteria. The rule, which was initiated in 2001, requires companies to value an asset for sale at the lower of either its carrying amount or its fair value less the cost to sell. Future operating losses cannot be recognized before they occur.

But these gestures

follow a string of missteps by the company

, including paying out $168 million to anywhere from 300 to 400 employees in its financial product unit between December 2008 and March 2009. This was after AIG received its massive bailout loan from the government.

In one of the most entertaining -- and eye-rolling -- aspects of the report, it was noted that a kitchen assistant even received a $7,700 retention bonus. Of course, to put that in perspective, it should be noted that senior executives raked in some $4 million.

On Tuesday, the Obama administration's pay czar, Kenneth Feinberg, said AIG

must reduce the $198 million in scheduled retention payments

, but did not reveal by how much.

-- Reported by Jeanine Poggi in New York

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