Feels like a tired Friday, doesn't it? The secondaries aren't holding that well except the one that is now the poster boy of the attorneys general around the country, and we have a ton of minus signs.

Marcial's stuff from

Business Week

is taking its usual toll on people's wallets, although I am happy to see that people are willing to have some perspective and aren't gunning some of the thinner ones into the stratosphere.

And the amazing Gilder is having great second-day traction in

Terayon

(TERN)

, which we left yesterday thinking it could not possibly go higher. Kick me!

As the cop said to Jack Nicholson at the end of one of my favorite movies, "Forget it, Jake. It's expiration."

Random musings:

Oh my, have the boards become a vitriolic place. Not a huge shock -- the boards have never been for the meek. But now the business press, which has, shall we say, some conflicts when it comes to writing about a rival like

TheStreet.com

(TSCM)

, is starting to resemble the same kind of ethical rigor usually reserved for anonymous board posters. It's unworldly to see the

Journal

,

MSNBC

,

The New York Times

, the

Financial Times

and

CBS MarketWatch

-- some of our chief competitors -- blithely defining what may happen to us. And without an ounce of shame or conflict revealed. Jim Ledbetter at

The Industry Standard

has a good take on this

Alice in Wonderland

scene. Check it out

here.

And, let me reiterate that our intentions from the day we started

TheStreet.com

have never wavered. We are working to level the playing field for the millions of investors who want to control their own finances. We would never let any entity, corporate or individual, dissuade us from that mission. To those who think otherwise, as the title of this column says, you are Wrong.

James J. Cramer is manager of a hedge fund and co-founder of TheStreet.com. At time of publication, his fund was long DoubleClick and TheStreet.com, and Cramer was long TheStreet.com. His fund often buys and sells securities that are the subject of his columns, both before and after the columns are published, and the positions that his fund takes may change at any time. Under no circumstances does the information in this column represent a recommendation to buy or sell stocks. Cramer's writings provide insights into the dynamics of money management and are not a solicitation for transactions. While he cannot provide investment advice or recommendations, he invites you to comment on his column at

jjcletters@thestreet.com.