NEW YORK (TheStreet) - Third-quarter earnings season has been busy, and Jon Najarian, senior economic analyst at Capital Gold Group, gave his opinion to TheStreet's Joe Deaux about some of this week's big news.

Caterpillar

(CAT) - Get Report

announced third-quarter results on Wednesday and disappointed Wall Street. While the numbers weren't that surprising, Najarian said that the CEO's dour outlook was a bit more concerning and unexpected.

With

Freeport-McMoRan

(FCX) - Get Report

and

Alcoa

(AA) - Get Report

doing much better, he added that Caterpillar's outlook should be brighter and that a the stock's drop may be a buying opportunity.

Boeing

(BA) - Get Report

, meanwhile, reported strong third-quarter earnings, beating on both the top and bottom lines. Najarian suggested the stock will continue to run up into the end of the year, especially with the company's strong backlog and positive sentiment.

Finally,

Netflix

(NFLX) - Get Report

has been volatile following its earnings report. But perhaps causing more of a stir was hedge fund manager Carl Icahn's partial exit from the stock. While Icahn's great at buying near the bottom, he's doesn't necessarily sell at the top, Najarian said, citing that

Hain Celestial Group

(HAIN) - Get Report

has continued to rally despite Icahn exiting his position earlier this year.

Najarian concluded that Icahn made a smart risk-management move by locking in some profits and that Netflix can continue higher. Najarian added that Icahn still has a 4.5% stake in the stock.

-- Written by Bret Kenwell in Petoskey, Mich.

Follow @BretKenwell

Bret Kenwell currently writes, blogs and also contributes to Robert Weinstein's Weekly Options Newsletter. Focuses on short-to-intermediate-term trading opportunities that can be exposed via options. He prefers to use debit trades on momentum setups and credit trades on support/resistance setups. He also focuses on building long-term wealth by searching for consistent, quality dividend paying companies and long-term growth companies. He considers himself the surfer, not the wave, in relation to the market and himself. He has no allegiance to either the bull side or the bear side.