Remdesivir has little effect on Covid-19 mortality

njbr

This is how many studies now on remdesivir with negative results?

Time for more Gilead pumping for a dud...

.. Results from the WHO’s highly anticipated Solidarity trial, which studied the effects of remdesivir and three other potential drug regimens in 11,266 hospitalised patients, found that none of the treatments “substantially affected mortality” or reduced the need to ventilate patients, according to a copy of the study seen by the Financial Times.

“These remdesivir, hydroxychloroquine, lopinavir and interferon regimens appeared to have little effect on in-hospital mortality,” the study found.

Comments (7)
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Casual_Observer2020
Casual_Observer2020

It has been a terrible week for covid treatments. 2 stopped vaccine trials and more reports that therapeutics just dont work for more than a few weeks and now this.

Carl_R
Carl_R

“These remdesivir, hydroxychloroquine, lopinavir and interferon regimens appeared to have little effect on in-hospital mortality,” the study found.

It's become abundantly clear than antivirals are only effective if given early, as soon as a patient is infected, and before the virus replicates. I don't know why they keep wasting money on in-hospital studies, and fail to do pre-hospital studies. Note that Regeneron is being tested in a pre-hospital study, so it will almost certainly have a positive result. Remdesivir probably would, too, but since it has to be administered via IV, that isn't practical pre-hospital.

FWIW, Icatibant worked well in-hospital, but then, it's not an anti-viral. It's an anti-bradykinan-storm drug.

Sechel
Sechel

This is old news. no impact on mortality but it does reduce infection time by several days so there is value. that's why its not a cure but a treatment

Sechel
Sechel

Strictly based on laymen's knowledge and what I read I'm guessing that the steroids Trump was given may have had the biggest impact. What gets many covid-19 patients into trouble is inflammation issues that occur a week to ten days after infection. of course no one really knows and trump's not qualified to answer that ans his was an experiment of one with no controlled variables.

njbr
njbr

Don't count on Regeneron---and you are vulnerable again in a few months....

In an interview with CBS News’ “Face the Nation,” Regeneron REGN, -2.60% CEO Leonard Schleifer — whose company made the experimental drug cocktail that apparently helped Trump — warned against jumping to conclusions.

“So the president’s case is a case of one, and that’s what we call a case report, and it is evidence of what’s happening, but it’s kind of the weakest evidence that you can get,” he said, according to a CBS News transcript.

Schleifer said that while Trump’s case had “some very interesting aspects,” such as his age and risk factors, his results are “just low down on the evidence scale that we really need.”

“The real evidence has to come — about how good a drug is and what it will do on average — has to come from these large clinical trials, these randomized clinical trials, which are the gold standard. And those are ongoing,” he said.

Trump’s doctors said Saturday the president was no longer at risk of spreading the virus, and Trump told Fox News on Sunday that he’s now immune to COVID-19.

Schleifer was cautious in that assessment as well. While saying the Regeneron drug “does” create immunity, it’s not known how long it lasts. “Could be months, could be years,” he said. “If you get it in our vial, if you will, that’s probably going to last you for months.”

Schleifer also addressed Trump’s call for the Regeneron drug to be distributed for free to all who need it. The U.S. government has bought 300,000 doses for $450 million, which will be distributed for free, and Schleifer said there are already 50,000 doses ready to go.

Still, with the U.S. averaging nearly 50,000 new cases a day last week, “It’s not enough,” Schleifer said, adding that if the drug is found to be effective, other drug makers will be needed to pitch in on production. “Regeneron can’t do this alone. We need the entire industry,” he said.

Until then, he said the government and local health authorities should decide who gets the drug. “The vulnerable people, elderly people, people who are at high risk, household contacts perhaps. We have to figure out ways to ration this,” he said.