German Social Democrats Seek an Independent EU Army

Mish

The Social Democrats are fed up with tireless questions. They want to act.

SPD Seeks Ability to Act

Please note the SPD calls for the introduction of an Independent EU Army subordinate to the European Commission.

"Our aim is to improve the EU's ability to act, regardless of the tiresome questions of sovereignty," Fritz Felgentreu, defence policy spokesman for the SPD told the newspaper Welt am Sonntag.

Why? To Do What?

Eurointelligence had some choice comments in its take Muddled Thinking on EU Defence.

This is one of those ideas where you don't know where to begin dismantling it. Our first thought was this: are they trying to do to defence what they did to the eurozone? Create a dysfunctional system in the vague hope that future generations will fix it, except that this time we are using live ammo and killing people? Have they considered what might happen if the European Commission charged into battle and lost? The British are still traumatised by the Charge of the Light Brigade in the Crimean War. An army is not an inter-institutional working group that meets on Tuesdays.

The paper also reveals a shocking lack of understanding of the EU's security priorities in the early 21st century. The biggest threats to our security right now do not stem from invasion by a foreign power, or our refusal to participate in a war in the Middle East or Africa. Our list of priorities would include the following: defence against cyber threats from Russia and China; a restoration of the Iran nuclear deal; the co-ordination of the fight against terrorism; the push against empire-building in our neighbourhood; and a defence of EU companies and individuals targeted by the US for secondary economic sanctions. It is rather difficult to think of an EU security interest for which you would need a European army.

The moment you have an army, some nutcase politician is sure to want to deploy it, and not for defense either. 

Look at the endless wars the US has been in for decades. We blew trillions of dollars in Vietnam, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Syria.

We arm unstable regimes in the Pakistan and the Mideast and have repeatedly threatened to blow up Iran.

The US is not any safer for any of it. 

Now the SPD wants the EU to go down the same path, taxing the citizens when there are far more pressing needs.

The EU does not need and cannot afford an independant army. 

Mish

Comments (37)
No. 1-23
Six000mileyear
Six000mileyear

Not to mention NATO already exists. But suggesting the creation of an independent EU army would imply the withdrawal from NATO. Europe can't afford to forgive the German's for WW1 and WW2 to the point of rebuilding a military of continental size.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

Maybe they could invade countries that want to leave the EU...Is is too late to stop Brexit?

Scooot
Scooot

It’s all part of the drive towards a Federal Europe.

Bam_Man
Bam_Man

Sure, there's lots of extra "money" laying around to pay for this.

Jojo
Jojo

You ain't a playa in today's world unless you have a captive army to back you up!

EGW
EGW

If the EU wants to become the "world police" I say go for it. Maybe then we can bring our troops home and focus on building up our country and not others.

EGW
EGW

If you think about it, the EU has essentially accomplished what Hitler dreamed of (A Europe ruled by Germany), minus the bloodshed and genocide.

amigator
amigator

If we fessed up to all the bad things we do as a country it would make Russian inference in our election look as silly as using Facebook to attack us!

Keep in mine that our new President has been part of that system for almost 50 years now.

njbr
njbr

Reading the original German...

The force is intended to be a "rapid reaction force" with 1500 troops at first and 8,000 (including logistics and medical) in the future--under the direction of the EU.

Realistically, this would make, at the most, 500 troops available at first for action (growing to 2,500 in the future).

Not a giant army--certainly much smaller than most military arms of EU members.

I can see the political attraction of an arms-length military force for individual EU member to deal with certain "difficult" problems.

Of course it wouldn't displace the need for all of the present and most likely dangers to security, but it does address a limited set of limited physical problems.

They'd probably end up no more well armed than a US large-city SWAT team.

caradoc-again
caradoc-again

All they have to do is contribute their percentages to NATO.

They don't do that so where is the money suddenly coming from?
ECB will print it and give it to France to fund their defence.
See the Bastille day parade with Merkel and the Dutch bloke there.

Watch the Turks or Russians whip their asses when push comes to shove. Armies do best, and fight hardest, when defending their own not defending some supra-national bureaucracy of stuffed shirt politicians who've never done a proper job.

Doug78
Doug78

It's a joke. Germany sees it's future as a sort of gigantic Switzerland. It is, like Switzerland is now, surrounded by buffer states none of which want to invade it. It allows them to trade with anyone in the world without having to pay for the stability that permits this trade to begin with. Now the big thing in Germany is to pay some operating expenses of NATO in lieu of actual combat forces and claim that as helping to protect Europe. The important thing is that they can then be able to escape actual risk of military operations and the avoid the economic, political and personal fallout that defence operations entail. They would not have any "skin in the game" and leave the risks to other countries on the frontline. It is a very cynical policy but that is what realpolitik is. At least they don't preach to us. That is a good thing. Other countries in the EU know it. The French see themselves as protecting Europe's southern flank, the UK the sea lanes, Scandinavia the northern flank. Poland the eastern flank and Germany in the center protecting nothing not even themselves. They are in a good position and they know it and they won't change. Why should they? From time to time they make some noises but it just PR.

njbr
njbr

Ya'll think this is an army being set up to oppose the world super-powers and go adventuring around the world, re-establishing the glory days of empires.

It's a proposal for multi-national SWAT team.

Which might come in handy in a world of trans-national terrorism.

Given that the US is unreliable.

Tengen
Tengen

I've been expecting an EU army for a while, I think France floated this idea a few years ago too. The purpose is not to project power outward, but for internal use to keep their own populations in check.

As it stands now, US assistance would be needed to quell riots in most of the EU countries.

Webej
Webej

These are politicians pursuing political ends.
Decoded, the message is that the EU is sick and tired of being a vassal of American geopolitics and wants to be able to set its own course. Since geopolitics is governed by military muscle, that is what the EU wants. Not for any particular military end, since there are no rational military conflicts to be engaged in.

As it is, Europe wastes a good deal on NATO but the only thing it buys is subjugation to the American overlords in charge of policy.

As for EuroIntelligence's little list of actual security concerns, it is just a tiresome litany of the BS that Western Imperialism always rattles by rote as rationalizations for hidden agendas: Russia, China, Iran, cyber-attacks, terrorism -- same old.

njbr
njbr

Covid-19 mink variants found in humans in Netherlands, South Africa, Switzerland, Faroe Islands, Russia and Utah [US].

Anda
Anda

An EU army means one thing, that the commission is at the table and turned to to
enforce "Law to Remedy the Distress of People and the" Union.

Some here think european countries are not adventurous, politically and militarily ? They tend to coordinate behind US policy, or use it. France and Germany are the main participators, whether in sales, policy or action, Spain and Italy not far behind. The moral hazard is obvious, witnessed at so many other levels in EU.

nzyank
nzyank

"The EU does not need and cannot afford an independant army. "
So do you prefer they continue to rely on US funded NATO?? At this point the EU is much better off moving towards defense independence than relying on NATO and an unstable US. Where possible, it is better that the US step back internationally, at least until we regain credibility, which could take some time. This doesn't mean abandoning existing commitments, friends and strategic interests. Lots of judgment and expertise required here, as opposed to shoot from the hip, or turn tail and run approaches.

Scooot
Scooot

An EU army would become a massive black hole, a sponge soaking up and diverting financial resources from everything else. Once established it will just keep on growing. The bureaucracy surrounding it would dwarf everything else. European Nations will become less independent and their people will have less sway in determining their own fortunes. It’s a great danger to peace in my opinion.

Sechel
Sechel

Two big reasons Europe is pushing for a European army

  1. Donald Trump has scared Europe into thinking the U.S. is not reliable as an ally
  2. U.K. leaving the E.U.
Sechel
Sechel

Of course the E.U. needs an army. Many of the member states are too weak and small on their own to provide for effective national security or security for Europe. It's only by pooling resources can they hope to achieve this. Donald Trump changed the equation. His rhetoric and actions woke Europe up. The U.K. leaving the EU. just adds to that need.

FromBrussels
FromBrussels

....when you come to think of it , underneath our, keeping up appearances veneer, we are just as primitive as the Neanderthals or WORSE even, if we still need armies, 'siphilized' and informatized as we are....

FromBrussels
FromBrussels

Like Tengen said, an army to keep the own population in check,when pandemic related issues run out of hand, not to mention (more) social economic uprisings etc ...

KidHorn
KidHorn

I'm all for it. Let them defend themselves against invisible enemies. And we may need to ally with them against China at some point.


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