Chris Martenson Video: "WHO is Derelict" on Coronavirus

Mish

Chris Martenson does not believe the stats from China on coronavirus illnesses and fatalities. Neither do I.

In his latest video, Chris Martenson says the World Health Organization (WHO) is "derelict" in its duties. He also challenges reports from China on the number of people infected .

Click on the above image to play the video.

In a comparison to SARS, a coronavirus event in 2003, Chris notes the latest virus spreads before symptoms appear, SARS didn't. But this the data challenge that caught my ear.

Chris looked at Wuhan as a city district, a city of 11 million people, and noted 49,00 beds. He asks, is it reasonable that 2,000 cases would fill all those beds, with hallways swamped with patients and people dead and sick lying in the hallways?

"This takes my BS meter and puts it into orange. ... 2,000 just doesn't fit right"

Shrugging his shoulder Chris says "I'm thinking 10 times that number."

"The World Health Organization has really been derelict. My critique is they were pretending to be the World Trade Organization, not the World Health Organization. They are more concerned about the impact on trade than a public health emergency. "

Increasing Ability to Spread

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Age Group Risk

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China says the risk is changing. But there is only one direction it can be charging towards, and it doesn't look good.

Hong Kong Strike

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Those image clips are all from the video.

Anger Mounts

Please note China’s Premier Tours Virus Epicenter as Anger Bubbles at Crisis Response

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang traveled to the epicenter of the country’s dangerous viral outbreak to meet infected patients and front-line health workers, signaling the Beijing leadership’s concern as public frustration rises over how local officials have handled the crisis.

The central government website published photos on Monday showing Mr. Li wearing a face mask and swaddled in blue protective gear as he toured medical facilities in Wuhan, a sprawling city in central China where the outbreak began. In one image, Mr. Li appeared to be speaking through a walkie-talkie to a patient on a video screen.

Chinese leader Xi Jinping usually reserves the top position on important issues for himself, but in this instance he appointed Mr. Li to head up the Communist Party’s virus-response task force.

Gee, I wonder why he sent someone else.

Stay Where You Are

In an unusual move, the central government said Monday it was extending the annual Lunar New Year holiday, currently under way, by two days to Feb. 2 to delay the infection risk posed by the migration of tens of millions of mostly rural laborers back to their workplaces in the cities. The manufacturing hub of Suzhou went one step further, ordering people not to come back to work until Feb. 9.

Some of the country’s biggest tech companies followed suit. TikTok-owner Bytedance Inc. issued a notice urging employees in mainland China to work from home until a week beyond the extended holiday. Shenzhen-based games and social-media giant Tencent Holdings Ltd. sent out a note telling local staff to do the same.

Global Coronavirus Cases Jump 50% Overnight, 5 Now in US

Earlier today I noted Global Coronavirus Cases Jump 50% Overnight, 5 Now in US

Many of you know Chris Martenson from his economic website, Peak Prosperity.

But even those who do know him, may not be aware that his background includes a PhD in pathology.

If you have not done so already, please do yourself a favor and watch Chris Martenson's Must See Video on the Coronavirus.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

Comments (34)
No. 1-13
Casual_Observer
Casual_Observer

The worst of it is about 1M people left Wuhan while potentially carrying the virus. It seems like it can be communicable even when people are asymptomatic. Multiple research outlets reporting treatment is the same as that of SARS but this is an evolution of SARS virus. Maybe someone who survives it can produce the antibodies to save a lot of people.

Casual_Observer
Casual_Observer

leicestersq
leicestersq

"Chris looked at Wuhan as a city district, a city of 11 million people, and noted 49,00 beds. He asks, is it reasonable that 2,000 cases would fill all those beds, with hallways swamped with patients and people dead and sick lying in the hallways?"

Seems entirely reasonable to me. I would guess that the number of beds in a city that size has been adjusted over time to cope with the normal capacity of medical need. This virus will act at the margin on the demand for beds. A well honed system can be thrown out of kilter by a sudden change at the margin.

Sechel
Sechel

I'm sticking with incompetence on this one. Hanlons' razor and all. The Chinese system doesn't have a lot of checks and balances. Free press is weak to non-existent. Everyone afraid and trying to cover their tuchus. This is on from the South Morning China post. Honk Kong's WSJ

The mayor of Wuhan – the central Chinese city at the epicentre of the deadly coronavirus outbreak – said his administration’s handling of the crisis had not been good enough, as Chinese Premier Li Keqiang arrived to take charge of the effort to curb the spread of the virus.
Zhou Xianwang made the remarks in an interview on Monday with state broadcaster CCTV amid rising public anger over the city’s management of the crisis.
Zhou defended the decision to lock down Wuhan, a city of 11 million people, as an effective way to curb the spread, and said he and Wuhan Communist Party chief Ma Guoqiang were willing to take responsibility.
“If people want to pursue accountability [about the lock down] and the public has a strong opinion, we are willing to step down,” he said. Zhou also admitted that the city government’s disclosure of information had been “unsatisfactory”.

Winn
Winn

Hospitals are almost always full all the time. Daily discharged and admitted patients are about the same. The hospitals can't cope with sudden influx of patients even though they have to discharge as much as they can. And these patients can't be admitted to ordinary hospitals as all the patients will be infected. These patients have to go to communicable disease hospitals. So you can see that kind of scene. There might be about one or two in Wuhan.

thankyoumrdata
thankyoumrdata

Speaking as a lung specialist physician: Certainly this is a serious global health risk that should be taken seriously. (And it would not be surprising in the least if China were lowballing the estimates, by an order of magnitude even.)

That being said, let us not forget that in the 2018-19 season, the CDC estimates that 61,200 people died in the USA of influenza, and estimates of the worldwide annual death toll range from five to ten times that, around 300-600K.

(As a digression, tuberculosis, diarrheal diseases and road injury kill, annually, more than a million people, each, worldwide. The most common seven diseases of the elderly together kill 25-30M annually, worldwide.)

Lower respiratory infections kill almost three million people worldwide every year, so only 10-20% of that is attributable to influenza.

Novel 2019 coronavirus is scary because it is new and a relative unknown. That makes it easy to fear a global pandemic. Every time a new pathogen comes out, everyone is inclined to do so.

While you are worrying about that, though, try to put it in context. This is likely to fall somewhere in the continuum from SARS / MERS (while acknowledging the tragedy of those it kills, ultimately not a big deal globally) to influenza (the global pandemic we already have, a huge killer annually that nobody is breathlessly reporting on, because we're used to it). More likely the former, given those first two are also coronaviruses.

njbr
njbr

.....Hong Kong infectious disease experts are urging the government to take “draconian” measures against the spread of the deadly new coronavirus from the mainland Chinese city of Wuhan, citing research estimating that 44,000 patients could be infected there – far higher than official figures. University of Hong Kong academics on Monday estimated that the number of patients in Wuhan had reached 43,590 by Saturday, including those in the incubation stage of the virus, which causes pneumonia....Leung said his team’s research showed self-sustaining human-to-human transmission was already happening in all major mainland cities and warned that a pandemic might be close. “We have to be prepared, that this particular epidemic may be about to become a global epidemic,” he said.....

ksdude69
ksdude69

So I wonder how many people those 5 in the have had contact with? Also, i'm getting tired of hearing comparisons to Influenza and other things trying to downplay this into something that doesn't compare. This is a ridiculous comparison. This is possibly still in its infants stage.

Blurtman
Blurtman

One positive about the outbreak - it’s given bored internet kibitzers something to talk about. Sort of the electronic version of the gladiator spectacles.

AWC
AWC

I would be willing to bet Chris is getting a lot of new subscriptions about now. Making lemonade out of lemons, as it were? But, until I see the msm go from leading stories on Kobe and Peach Mint, to Coronavirus, I’ll just hang around town and observe.

Latkes
Latkes

The number of infected is likely many times higher than official stats say, while the number of deaths is likely much less understated. That means that the death rate is probably much lower than feared.

CautiousObserver
CautiousObserver

I agree with @Winn on this. Hospitals not being able to cope is likely NOT an indication that an order of magnitude more people are hospitalized than is being reported. We live in a world of "just in time" inventory management. Hospitals cannot afford to sit around with 50% of their beds empty until an event like this happens. They are mostly full all the time during normal circumstances. Similarly, grocery stores operate with only a few days inventory based upon normal demand.

However, this arrangement does contribute to people being nervous when something unexpected happens. Everyone knows there is not enough slack in system to cope with sudden high demand if this does turn out to be highly contagious and maybe twice as serious as the common Flu. Everyone also knows governments tend to downplay risks in an effort to prevent panic from causing self-inflicted damage, further fomenting distrust.

Except for possibly a few researchers at the center of this storm, the rest of us are stuck with a lack of good information being a "known unknown." Everything will probably okay in the end despite whatever screw-ups happen along the way. It almost always is.

AWC
AWC


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