24 States Reach Their Highest Level of Covid Hospitalizations

Mish

Record Covid Hospitalizations 

Record Hospitalizations

Bloomberg reports Hospitalizations due to Covid-19 are rising in 49 states or territories in the U.S., including 24 reaching their highest number since the beginning of the pandemic. Texas leads all states with at least 6,170 patients now hospitalized, but 20 states still have a higher rate per capita.

Daily New Cases 7-Day Average

Daily New confirned Covid Cases 2020-11-10

Daily New Deaths 7-Day Average

Daily New confirned Covid Deaths 2020-11-10

Covid Tweets of the Day

Other than the above and dozens of related stats, Covid vanished right after the election.

Mish

Comments (63)
No. 1-20
Lance Manly
Lance Manly

Yesterday was a 12.2% positivity rate, like in the bad old days at the end of April. The majority of states aren't moving now to control it, and even if\when they do turning around a pandemic is like turning around an oil tanker. The restrictions in Europe are just starting to show results.

This is why I don't see the vaccine as being huge for the US. We are going to have a super spike in Nov-Feb just like 1919 unless we do something soon. Some states may be ok but the majority, not so much. Once we get to spring the tinder will have been burnt and the seasonality will be on the wane. For other countries that have controlled the virus it will be huge though.

PecuniaNonOlet
PecuniaNonOlet

Second wave was always going to be worse than the first. The only good news is chief clown will be out of office soon but he is already blocking transition ala “rule or ruin” nonsense clearly choosing ruin first for america.

My employer still has a no travel and work from home policy, I assume it will continue for most of 2021 if not all of it however more layoffs coming so we will see.

Rocky Raccoon
Rocky Raccoon

I was under the impression watching the news that Texas was seeing a massive spike, but clearly in November, they aren't even as close to their peak a few months before.

TexasTim65
TexasTim65

I live in South Florida. At the time of July, I didn't know anyone who had the virus. Now in November, I know plenty of people who have had it. I only know 1 person who has died from it and he was very overweight and in uncertain health. Of the rest, one was hospitalized (fairly overweight) and everyone else would barely have known they had it other than they tested positive (in some cases the wife or husband never caught it despite sleeping in the same bed).

In my social circle there is zero interest in a lockdown (much of my circle consists of beer league hockey teams and co-workers). Masks are worn here in stores and that's about the extent of it.

The USA has roughly an extra 200K deaths this year (so far) over an average year. Those 200K are almost certainly the Covid deaths. While not nice (esp for those who died), it's insignificant next to the total population (340 million). What will be really interesting is how many extra deaths there are next year or whether the deaths are less than expected because the virus many have pulled demand forward from the elderly/sick.

Casual_Observer
Casual_Observer

There will be no economic normalcy until covid is dealt with correctly. Trump administration wasted 2020 and now the country suffers for it. The economy will get shut down one way or another. I fully expect some places to have people dying at home soon. The colder the weather gets the more easily covid spreads.

BobSmith
BobSmith

I'm a medical professional in Florida and it seems there is a different strain with our patients.

Dodge Demon
Dodge Demon

I hope everybody here took advantage of the recent 100% off sale at the Chicago Macy’s on State Street the other day. 100% compliance with the mayor’s and governor’s mask rule, too.

truthseeker
truthseeker

My wife and I were exposed Friday to a friend, 71, who was very sick several days ago who tested positive though is much better today. So yesterday we had ourselves tested and will know the results in the next few hours. Interesting to note Matt:24-8 “beginning of sorrows”kJV and Luke:21-7-11 epidemics is mentioned for the first time.

Jojo
Jojo

Speaking of hospitals, they aren't on board with Biden interest in lowering the Medicare age, which would be a big help to many who get Covid-19. They are afraid of losing profits.

Biden Wants To Lower Medicare Eligibility Age To 60, But Hospitals Push Back
November 11, 20209:00 AM ET

Of his many plans to expand insurance coverage, President-elect Joe Biden's simplest strategy is lowering the eligibility age for Medicare from 65 to 60.

But the plan is sure to face long odds, even if the Democrats can snag control of the Senate in January by winning two runoff elections in Georgia.

Republicans, who fought the creation of Medicare in the 1960s and typically oppose expanding government entitlement programs, are not the biggest obstacle. Instead, the nation's hospitals — a powerful political force — are poised to derail any effort. Hospitals fear adding millions of people to Medicare will cost them billions of dollars in revenue.

njbr
njbr

In Michigan (patients discharged from hospital 4/1 to 7/1)

....Of 1648 patients with COVID-19 admitted to 38 hospitals, 398 (24.2%) died during hospitalization and 1250 (75.8%) survived. Of 1250 patients discharged alive, 975 (78.0%) went home whereas 158 (12.6%) were discharged to a skilled nursing or rehabilitation facility (Table 1). By 60 days after discharge, an additional 84 patients (6.7% of hospital survivors and 10.4% of intensive care unit [ICU]-treated hospital survivors) had died, bringing the overall mortality rate for the cohort to 29.2%, and 63.5% for the 405 patients who received treatment in an ICU. Within 60 days of discharge, 189 patients (15.1% of hospital survivors) were rehospitalized....

...Cardiopulmonary symptoms (such as cough and dyspnea) were reported by 159 patients, including 92 with new or worsening symptoms and 65 with persistent loss of taste or smell. Fifty-eight patients reported new or worsening difficulty completing activities of daily living. Among 195 patients who were employed before hospitalization, 117 had returned to work whereas 78 could not because of ongoing health issues or job loss. Of the 117 patients who returned to work, 30 reported reduced hours or modified duties due to health reasons.

Nearly half of all patients (238 of 488) reported being emotionally affected by their health, and 28 sought care for mental health after discharge. Moreover, 179 patients reported at least a mild financial impact from their hospitalization, with 47 reporting use of most or all of their savings and 35 rationing food, heat, housing, or medications due to cost....

njbr
njbr

Gabriel Bosslet--Pulmonary and Critical Care fellowship program director, Assistant Dean of Faculty Development at @iumedschool
@gbosslet
·
1h
What people seem to not understand is that COVID therapeutics really don't do much.

We seem to talk about therapeutics constantly when we should be focusing on preventing community spread.

njbr
njbr

About 1 out of every 54 people in South Dakota is considered an active COVID case right now

njbr
njbr

Megan McArdle
@asymmetricinfo
·
5h
Cannot emphasize this enough: What New York City did in March will not be possible now. It's too widely distributed to ship personnel in from everywhere else to help handle the spike.Too many places need extra help, too few places able to donate it.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

Four of my employees got tested today. Two who were exposed outside work....and two other employees who work in close physical proximity to the ones who were exposed.

The exposed employees got PCR tests and won’t know the results for a couple of days at least..they have to quarantine until then or find a place to give them a rapid test that shows they’re negative.

The other two employees got rapid tests today and were both negative.....but the local test center said the incidence of false negatives is 16%....so they also got PCR tests to confirm they’re negative. Waiting on those too.

None of these people has been symptomatic, and they all were masks faithfully and properly at work.

Another employee got a call from her child’s preschool informing her that several children there tested positive today.

I haven’t gotten tested since May..but if any of these people turn up positive I’ll have to get tested immediately.

Tis the season.

Eddie_T
Eddie_T

You can get a PCR test here for free most days.....maybe every day....but the rapid tests we paid for today cost $130 cash up front.

And one correction....I was just informed a third employee was given a rapid test today and also tested negative...So I’m out roughly $400 for tests today and more than that in lost productivity. I’m grateful nobody so far is positive....but the cost and the disruption of scheduled appointments...which people wait to get...does matter to our bottom line.

Sechel
Sechel

Meanwhile Sweden's approach has been an abject failure

“So far Sweden’s strategy has proven to be a dramatic failure,” said Lena Einhorn, a Swedish virologist and prominent critic of its strategy. “Four days ago we had eight times higher cases per capita than Finland and three and a half times more than Norway. They were supposed to have it worse off than us in the autumn because we were going to have immunity.”

Even Sweden’s public health agency admits its earlier prediction that the country’s Nordic neighbours such as Finland and Norway would suffer more in the autumn appears wrong. Sweden is currently faring worse than Denmark, Finland and Norway on cases, hospitalisations and deaths relative to the size of their population.

bobbyvelvet
bobbyvelvet

I don't understand why the cost of hospitalizations isn't being covered by the media or discussed by anyone. Someone is going to pay for this. Whether it be the person hospitalized, the government (via medicare due to the age of those getting the sickest ) or the insured. My rates as a small business owner just went up 13% for 2021.


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